The Hush Treasure Book and Australian Kids through the Years

HushThere used to be much anticipation and excitement about children’s annual book ‘treasuries’ and other compilations. Now we have The Hush Treasure Book (Allen & Unwin) to dip into. This book is special for two reasons. Firstly, it takes the Australian charity ‘Hush’ into the world of books. The specially composed Hush CDs have been bringing music to children in hospitals since 2000. There are now fourteen ‘albums of original music to bring peace and hope to patients and their families’. A CD also accompanies this book.

Secondly, The Hush Treasure Book is a ‘treasure’ of Australian authors and illustrators of children’s books, including the successful partnerships of Glenda Millard and Stephen Michael King, and Mark Greenwood and Frane Lessac. Talented Karen Taylor has imaginatively edited the book with lovely attention to detail and Lee and Kevin Burgemeestre have designed the cover and title page. The book can be read through from beginning to end; or poems, short stories and other works could be chosen to suit the reader, an occasion or mood.

Short stories include ‘Doctor Maddie’ by Danny Katz, illustrated by Mitch Vane about sick Honey Bear, and ‘The Best Horse of All’ about a carousel, written by Margaret Wild and sumptuously illustrated by Julie Vivas.

My favourite story is the longest one, ‘Ghost Motel’ about a seemingly creepy motel, by Jackie French and Michael Camilleri.

Poems include ‘We can see the world from here’ written by Jane Godwin and illustrated by Anna Walker, which is apt for a child in bed; ‘Nothing to be scared of’ by Doug Macleod, illustrated from soaring bird’s-eye views by Craig Smith; ‘Oliver’s Town’ by Nick Bland; ‘Ward’ by Shaun Tan (complete with an illustration of an owl); and an exuberant, rhyming poem by Karen Tayleur and Ann James, ‘Dot the Tot’.

There is an amazing, beautifully constructed maze by Judith Rossell, which kept me fascinated till I completed it. What a clever addition to a book for children in bed.

There are also pieces by luminaries of Australian children’s literature Tohby Riddle, Alison Lester, Bob Graham and Jane Tanner; talented newcomers; and a wordless double page spread by Bruce Whatley, which seems to be paying homage to the style of Gregory Rogers.

KidsAnother wonderful book to browse through is Australian Kids through the Years, written by Tania McCartney with pictures by the inimitable Andrew Joyner, published by the National Library of Australia. This is a non-fiction text in picture book form. It looks at children from the first Australian Aboriginal children, the 1800-1840s, the 1850s on the goldfields, 1900-1909, the 1950s and each successive decade until the present. Many of the children come from different ethnic backgrounds.

Each era is described over two double page spreads, with an introduction to the children featured and then a double page of detailed illustration showing what the children, and those around them, are doing. The written text is minimal, often in speech bubbles and short lists; such as what children were reading in the early 1900s – Seven Little Australians, The Tale of Peter Rabbit, The Wind in the Willows, and playing in the 1990s – Rugby League, Power Rangers, Little Athletics, Tamagotchi and Super Soaker. It’s great to see 90s children reading Magic Beach by Alison Lester, not least because she features in Hush as well. Jackie French also appears in both books, here with Diary of a Wombat.Magic Beach

Children should be fascinated by changing Australia. No doubt extensive information has been carefully honed to make Australian Kids through the Years accessible and interesting. It is also very well designed.

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Joy Lawn

Joy Lawn writes the YA literature column for the Weekend Australian and interviews authors for Magpies magazine. She judges the Prime Minister’s Literary awards and has chaired the children’s literature panels for both the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards and Queensland Literary Awards and judged the CBCA and IBBY Honour (Australia) Awards. She specialises in children’s, YA and literary fiction. Joy promotes Australian literature here and overseas.