Review – Rockhopping by Trace Balla

Attributed as ‘a class act’ by The Australian.

Praised by leading industry professionals.

Acclaimed with prestigious awards.

imageHer previous title in the series, Rivertime (review), is the winner of several book prizes, including the Readings Children’s Book Prize, the Wilderness Society’s Environment Award, and shortlisted in the CBCA Awards, NSW Premier’s Literary Awards and Speech Pathology Australia Awards. Author illustrator Trace Balla has moved us once more with her new graphic, enchanting mountain adventure novel in Rockhopping.

With its sheer gravitational pull, Rockhopping takes its readers to gripping heights (and depths as it turns out!). You’ll discover moments of both unexpected intensity and serendipitous tranquility. Any primary school kid, or adult, excited by the possibilities of a hike through nature (particularly of the more challenging kind), and also those open to fortuitous opportunities won’t be disappointed by this symbolic quest.

imageClancy and his happy-go-lucky Uncle Egg spontaneously plan another camping trip following the success of their last one canoeing on the Glenelg River. Their aim is to find the source of the river. But Uncle Egg knows it won’t be easy so he ensures Clancy is trained and prepared weeks ahead of their journey. Backpacks full of supplies in tow, the pair begin their climb at the side of the Gariwerd (the Grampians) mountain range. Their time trekking around the rocks comes with not only physical, but emotional, strains. Using all their resources they find strength, willpower, companionship and loyalty to face and overcome the setbacks (including a rigorous endurance test by Uncle Egg to rescue Clancy, and his backpack, from a fall into a ravine). But at the same time they lap up the chances to appreciate each other and the wonder and beauty of the creatures and sights around them.

imageTrace Balla‘s text and illustrations are so child-friendly with their progressive narrative, enthralling dialogue and lively sequenced images that it makes us want to have a nature adventure of our own just to be able to document it in the same way! Her research and insights into the Victorian Range region, the Indigenous people and their history, ecologists and her own up close and personal encounters with leeches, swamps and cliffs are brilliantly intertwined into this book. Just like Clancy and Uncle Egg, Balla’s inspiration stemmed out of unforeseen travels and discoveries. Her message is so affecting:

image“When you stop trying to get anywhere and just be, a whole world of wonder can open up to you… The more you look the more you find out. It’s also about realising we are part of the natural world, rather than separate to it… It is a book that reminds us about being in touch with the earth.”

Rockhopping is an enriching, magical delight with endless scope for environmental, social and historical study as well as inciting self-discovery and philosophical reflections. Certainly an adventure you won’t want to miss!

Purchase Rockhopping by Trace Balla, published by Allen&Unwin, 2016.

#ByAustralianBuyAustralian