WARAMBI TELLS TWO STORIES

Warambi is Aleesah Darlison’s latest picture book and it’s a delightful story about a young bent-wing bat’s journey from just born and totally dependant on her mother to becoming independent and able to leave the forest cave that is her home.

She was no bigger than a bean. Her eyes were sealed shut and there wasn’t a scrap of fur on her body.

In the safety of the nursery cave, she practiced flying with the other pups until she was ready to go outside.

This simply told story manages to endear Warambi’s character to the reader and at the same time introduce them to the reality of the life of a baby bat.

One day Warambi’s world is thrown into turmoil by an excavator that destroys the bat’s cave home and separates her from the rest of the colony. Wanting to know the young bat’s fate will keep readers turning the pages..

One of the things I enjoyed most about Warambi was the way three important threads were woven seamlessly together – Warambi’s story, facts about bats and the impact of man on the environment.

The author uses beautiful imagery to allow the readers to picture the world in which Warambi lives. “Sunlight and metal burst into the darkness.”

Warrambi is a narrative non-fiction picture book and the text is taken to a new level by the illustrations of former zoologist, and well-loved illustrator, Andrew Plant. His understanding of, and appreciation for wildlife are apparent in his stunning pictures.

As well as being a visual delight, Warambi offers many layers of meaning for the reader, and the end papers are full of additional interesting facts about bats.

Lower Primary readers will find a lot to enjoy about Warambi. The story is based on a real event and has been released in the “Year of the Bat.”

This book tells two stories – the true life story of a bat’s life cycle and Warambi’s journey.

Warambi is published by Working Title Press.