G-Rated, Family-Friendly Book Porn

Apartment Bookshelf PornI should state up front that although this blog post is brought to you by the word ‘porn’, it is in fact completely g-rated and family friendly. The ‘porn’ it contains is related to books. Specifically, beautiful bookcases and book storage captured in photos and posted on a daily blog that’s not unlike the I’d Marry The Best If I Could Have A Library Like That I’ve written about previously.

Apartment Bookshelf PornI look forward to those daily postings with greater anticipation and salivation than I should probably admit, and doubly so now that I’m in the throes of finding spots for my books in a tiny, one-bedroom apartment. You could say I’ve got my own kind of Bookshelf Porn entries going on here, with an absence of newly installed bookcases meaning that I’m stashing (and loving and planning never to undo) books in my kitchen shelves and cupboards.

I can’t cook to save myself and books in the kitchen, while not ingredients I can physically consume, are nourishment for my mind. They’re the first thing I see when I come in the door each day and the last when I leave, and I wouldn’t have it any other way. It’s also proving a talking point with friends who stumble across the books when they’re opening doors to find cups and crockery.

Apartment Bookshelf PornWhen it comes to the main space I have for a bookcase, which is currently a blank [pictured at the bottom] wall, I’m thinking of going all out once my finances will allow. My not-so-secret dream is to have a room of floor-to-ceiling, wall-to-wall books. The closest I’ve got right now is a space that’s about two metres wide and three metres high.

My brother joked that I could get a ladder to go with the bookcases in this space. He quickly realised that one shouldn’t joke about such thing, because I’m now determined—however ridiculous it might seem for a small wall in a tiny, one-bedroom apartment—to get me floor-to-ceiling bookshelves and a ladder on which to ascend and slide side-to-side to access them.

Apartment Bookshelf PornWho knows? Maybe my quirky book space will be worthy of being featured on Bookshelf Porn one day—ridiculous ladder and all.

The Internet is for Porn (And So are Ebooks)

We all know it’s there, and there are a lot of us out there who use it – so why does the civilised internet like to pretend it doesn’t exist? That’s the question James Ledbetter asked in a column in Slate this week, when talking about erotica appearing on the Kindle store. Snip:

As I write this, the most downloaded item for Amazon’s Kindle is a novel by Jenna Bayley-Burke called Compromising Positions. Here is part of the plot description: “David Strong knows how to do a lot of things—run an international fitness company, finesse stock portfolios and stay out of emotional entanglements. That is, until he gets tangled up with Sophie Delfino and her Sensational Sex workout. He’s supposed to help her demonstrate Kama Sutra positions for her couples-yoga class. … And his co-instructor unexpectedly tests his control to the limit.”

As Ledbetter goes on to point out, one of the many reasons Compromising Positions (go on, look it up, I’ll wait) appears on the top list for fiction is that the publisher is giving it away free to promote the author or the series. This is one of the many ways in which producers of adult entertainment (and by adult, I mean porn) push the envelope of what is possible and experiment with new technology. And by that I mean with sales, distribution, content and marketing, not teledildonics.

Rule 34: If it exists, there is porn of it.

What annoys me about the article in Slate, however, is the presumption that given enough time and attention from the wrong sorts of people, Amazon may be forced to censor their listings.

Is it valuable to the company to goose interest in the Kindle with erotica giveaways, or will the presence of e-books like Compromising Positions at the top of Amazon’s charts sully the e-reader’s reputation?

My question for you today is simple: is this something we need to worry about? Is this another example of the way American prudishness is ruining the internet? Or should we be thinking of the children? Is erotica something we ought to be scared of, or something we should be happy about because at least people are reading it, instead of having it injected into their eye sockets? You decide – sound off in the comments and let me know what you think.