Boomerang Book Bites: The Day the Crayons Came Home by Drew Daywalt (illustrated by Oliver Jeffers)

Following on from the phenomenally brilliant The Day The Crayons Quit comes the sequel. The crayons are back…and they are still not happy. This time around Duncan has to deal with the lost and forgotten crayons. The broken, chewed and melted crayons. And they are all, quite rightly, even more upset!
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Review: The Day The Crayons Came Home by Drew Daywalt illus. Oliver Jeffers

9780008124434Following on from the phenomenally brilliant The Day The Crayons Quit comes the sequel. The crayons are back…and they are still not happy. This time around Duncan has to deal with the lost and forgotten crayons. The broken, chewed and melted crayons. And they are all, quite rightly, even more upset!

These are the crayons who have been lost behind the couch, taken by the dog or in some cases deliberately runaway. There’s crayons who aren’t happy with the name of their colour so they decided to change their name, (you go Esteban!) and there’s crayons who can’t remember what colour they are anymore (it’s been that long!). There’s some new colours to meet and a couple of our old favourites (who may or may not have finally sorted out who is the real colour of the sun).

Once again Drew Daywalt and Oliver Jeffers have produced a picture book that is an absolute joy to read out loud and share again and again (we still haven’t worn out the first book!). Oliver Jeffers’ wonderful illustrations are typically vibrant, absurd and brilliantly funny. And as with the first book each colour gives the reader the chance to read in a different voice for each colour, well at least that’s what I do anyway. This is another truly timeless picture book for the whole family to enjoy over and over again!

Buy the book here…

Review – Once Upon An Alphabet by Oliver Jeffers

9780007514274I am a huge Oliver Jeffers fan but have to admit his last few picture books haven’t hit the mark. That of course excludes the absolutely brilliant The Day The Crayons Quit he did with Drew Daywalt last year which was simply outstanding. Oliver Jeffers illustrations have always been outstanding but it was his stories that seemed to have drifted. Partnering with another writer seemed like a great idea but Jeffers has absolutely knocked it out of the park with his new book, Once Upon An Alphabet: Short Stories For All The Letters.

As the subtitle suggests this is an alphabet book with a difference. Jeffers gives four pages to every letter of the alphabet including a short story about each one. The stories are fabulous and deliciously absurd. Some are interconnected and others stand alone. There are funny stories, sad stories and typically Jeffers-esque morality tales. There are heroes, there is wisdom and best of all illustrations that burst, bubble and run wild over all the pages.

This is vintage Oliver Jeffers and I cannot wait to  share this over and over with my kids as there is so much to explore and enjoy in this marvellous picture book.

Buy the book here…

5 Faves from Afar

The volume of literary genius Australia possesses is staggering. Distill this down further to talented kids’ authors and illustrators and you’d still fill oceans, which is why I love showcasing our home grown children’s books.

But it’s impossible to ignore the magnitude of offerings from overseas too. So every now and then I’ll give you 5 Faves from overseas.

Here is the first fistful – all picture books this time round.

Waiting for Later1. Waiting for Later by Tina Matthews Walker Books Australia (OK published here but Tina is from NZ so sneaks in on this list). Nancy’s family are too busy to play with her. Each time she appeals for their attention, the reply is ‘later’. Nancy holds out for ‘later’ in a grand old tree in her garden with surprising results. An evocative cautionary tale reminding us of the precious brevity of childhood told in captivating book-end style.

2. Too Many Girls by Jonty Lees Eight Books Limited UK. Fun, frivolous and very pink in parts. Any Dad outnumbered by females will immediately sympathise with this poor fellow who is subject to an appalling lack of privacy, regular nail painting and indiscriminate hairstyling thanks to the females in his household. The crisis erupts in a ‘brush war’ resulting in some happy compromises and a lovely shade of purple. A lesson in the art of acceptance (and why men will never rule the world)Too many Girls

Fantastic Flying Books3. The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr Morris Lessmore by W E Joyce and Joe Bluhm. Simon & Schuster UK, originally by Athenum Books for Young Readers NY, USA. Immediately captivating. Glowing illustrations exude a burnished charm and warmth that complement the touching tale of Mr Morris Lessmore, a man who loved books and reading his whole life long. It’s a genuine never-ending story. Magnificently magic.

4. Blue Gnu by Kyle Mewburn and Daron Parton Scholastic NZ. Boo is not your average gnu. He’s blue for a start. And oscillates wildly betweenBlue Gnu yearning to fit in with the rest of the heard and being his own unique self. A warm and witty look a colours, patterns, differences and friendship.

This Moose belongs to Me5. This Moose Belongs to Me by Oliver Jeffers Harper Collins Children’s Books UK. Oliver Jeffers – enough said. One of my favourites of his. Illustrations divine enough to frame and hang on the wall plus a mockingly humorous story that questions the audacious assumption that we can really ever own anything outright in this world, equals pure genius. In the end, nature triumphs as does this must read picture book.

Do you have a favourite, unforgettable picture book? Let me know and it could make it onto 5 Faves.

Review – The Way Back Home

Hello. My name is Tania and I’m an Oliver Jeffers addict.

I’ve actually never laid eyes on The Way Back Home before, which is saying something because I have all book by Mr Jeffers. Somehow this one just kept escaping me. Maybe because every time I went to a shop to look for it, everyone else had bought it. And there’s a reason everyone else keeps buying books by Mr Jeffers.

They are glorious.

In The Way Back Home, we meet a little boy who finds a long-forgotten aeroplane in his closet. So he takes it for a straight-away whirl. As you do. The plane goes higher and higher and higher – until it sputters out of petrol and has to land on the moon.

In a parallel universe (actually, OUR universe), a wee Martian’s spaceship breaks down – and lands on the moon. That’s where the two youngsters meet.

Keen to return home and to help the Martian return home, the little boy jumps down from the moon into the ocean, swims to shore then scurries home for supplies. On the way back to the moon, the Martian drops him a rope and hauls him back up to fix the plane and spaceship. Then it’s time to say goodbye. Will they ever see each other again?

This is a sweetly simply story but it’s the divine, iconic illustrations and delicious subtleties that make Jeffers’ books stand out. His use of emotion and ‘real life kid’ propensity are just beautiful – and have enormous crossover appeal. A story about friendship, adventure and home – this book is wholeheartedly added to my joyful Jeffers collection.

The Way Back Home is published by HarperCollins.