Interview with Katrin Dreiling – Illustrator of The World’s Worst Pirate

From teaching in Germany to illustrating in Australia, Katrin Dreiling has literally come a long way to become the inspiring, creative and talented artist she is today. Celebrating her first picture book with award-winning author Michelle Worthington, we are fortunate enough to have Katrin join us for an awesome chat on her work and The World’s Worst Pirate. First, a little about the book.

Will hates being a pirate, and his buccaneering skills, or lack thereof, are obvious to the rest of the crew. His mother, the Captain, is less than impressed with his choice of passion – a scallywag chef in the galley. That is, until Will saves the entire ship from a bloodthirsty Kraken – by feeding it one of his delicious cupcakes! With all satisfied by the outcome, a change of heart sees Will become the best pirate-chef / Kraken-tamer / cupcake-maker of the seven seas.

Dreiling’s illustrations bring much life, colour and energy to this thought-provoking and empowering story about listening to your heart. Her cleverly curated techniques involving splashes and sprays, line and fluid watercolours, mixed with her unique and quirky stylised characters and scenes make for a playful, light-hearted romp on board this momentous deck.

Aspirational, with plenty of sweet and bubbly goodness to leave you licking your lips for more, The World’s Worst Pirate is a jolly and hearty quest for any pirate-loving (or not!) adventurer from age four.

Little Pink Dog Books, July 2017. Purchase here.

Katrin, congratulations on the release of your debut picture book, The World’s Worst Pirate! Can you tell us a bit about your journey towards being selected as illustrator for this book?

Thank you very much and thank you for inviting me to this interview! I have known Kathy and Peter Creamer for a little while simply through social media. They contacted me when I had just finished an illustration for my inky version of Hans Christian Andersen’s Princess and the Pea and bought the original artwork. When Little Pink Dog Books started to call for submissions Kathy was so kind to approach me again and this is how things started to flow. I really appreciate all their support. It is so important to know that someone believes in your work when you are just starting out.

The story by Michelle Worthington contains an empowering message about following your dreams despite challenges. Does this resonate with you? What were your challenges and rewards during the illustration process?

It resonates with me indeed on a very personal level. A couple of years ago I took the plunge to make a career change and start out as an illustrator which has been a very freeing experience for me considering my background. I am writing about this in more detail on my blog at katrindreiling.com. I thoroughly enjoyed the illustration process and working in this team and have to admit that the biggest challenge was to not eat too much chocolate…

I love your mix of line, watercolour, splashes and sprays! What a perfect combination of techniques for this book! What kinds of media did you use? How did you develop your unique style?

I usually like to mix media depending on what colour I’m after. For example, if I am about to create a cloud and I remember to have a beautiful blue paper somewhere in my paper collection I might decide to do a collaged cloud. I also always aim to incorporate techniques that children are familiar with (ink/ watercolour splashing) to inspire them to get creative, too.

What is your favourite part / illustration in The World’s Worst Pirate? Why?

I think I like the cover the best because I really enjoyed drawing those waves. They took forever but it was really relaxing to do. Also I liked having all characters on this one page and seeing how they look together.

How did you find collaborating with Michelle? Were there any surprising moments?

I have met Michelle years ago before this project when I was undertaking my own little publishing business. So I knew she was very professional to work with but I had no idea she would be so easy going and supportive. She made my job really easy and a pure delight.

How would you describe the support of the publishing team at Little Pink Dog Books? How long did the illustrations take to complete?

Little Pink Dog Books were equally supportive, very transparent and a joy to work with. The illustrations were done in three steps (sketching, storyboarding, final artwork) and I had plenty of time for each stage to help achieving the best results possible. I think altogether I was illustrating over a course of eight months.

Fun Question: What is your favourite flavour of cupcake?

Most certainly vanilla! Although I am very fond of chocolate, too…and I can never say no to mocha flavour but I think my favourite one would be choc chip cupcakes unless there’s the ones with fancy icing and strawberry flavour, they aren’t too bad either…..

Have you always wanted to be a children’s illustrator? Which artists influenced you along your journey?

It’s a life-long dream to work creatively but the direction of children’s illustrations was definitely influenced by my own three children. I could see how much impact the artwork has on little minds when reading a book together and I wanted to achieve exactly that. My favourite illustrators are Russell Ayto, Chuck Groenink and many French illustrators because I love the poetry in their art.

What else is on the cards for Katrin Dreiling? What can we look forward to seeing from you in the near future?

I recently finished a project with MacMillan Education and hope for more projects of that kind. Currently I am working on my own picture book manuscript and the illustrations and then I also recently signed my second contract with Little Pink Dog Books and Michelle Worthington. Illustration work for that one are well on the way and I sometimes give some sneak peaks on my social media…..

Thank you so much for your piratey participation, Katrin! 😊 🐙 

Argh!!!!! 

Katrin studied languages in Germany to become a teacher, and ended up being an illustrator in Australia. She loves to come up with quirky creations that inspire children to get creative themselves. She also provided the characters for animated university lectures and government staff coaching videos that attracted over 320,000 views worldwide to date. Katrin just finished her first pirate book written by Michelle Worthington and to be published by Little Pink Dog Books this year and currently works on a project to be published by Macmillan Education.  As much as she enjoys illustrating, she could not fully put her language studies behind her, occasionally authoring short stories. Katrin also enjoys giving colourful and messy art classes to kids twice a week. In her free time Katrin loves to spend time with her husband, three children and Golden Retriever “Loki”.

For my interview with Michelle Worthington on getting to know The World’s Worst Pirate, please head here.

#ByAustralianBuyAustralian

Double Dipping – Emotional support from Oliver and Tom

In my SE QLD literary backyard, there’s a charismatic dragon with a moxie rapidly earning him the reputation of a force to be reckoned with. He bides within a new young publishing house called Dragon Tales Publishing. Here are two of his latest issues; Oliver’s Grumbles and My brother Tom.

Each of these picture books are a little bit special, possessing a sensual hard cover feel that encourages you to hang on to them long after the last page is read. They deal with potentially difficult subjects to dress up in picture book format however manage it with tact and quiet sureness, ever mindful of their young audiences. What sings most vociferously about these two titles however is not the gravity of the subject matter rather the passion of the creators to share their experiences with readers. I applaud the bearing of souls and empathy displayed within and tip my (Christmas) hat to the dragon. He should be proud.

 Oliver’s Grumbles by Yvonne Mes and Giuseppe Poli, deals with emotional disaccord and internal conflict.

We’ve all had an attack of the grumbles. Mine, like those of a young child sometimes come from nowhere, out of the blue, without warning and are very (very) difficult to eradicate, as Oliver finds out. After a ‘particularly grizzly and growly day’, Oliver is plagued by Grumbles. They cause inexcusable mayhem and muck-ups but steadfastly refuse to go away. Oliver is neither able to entreat nor eradicate them. They even have the gall to snuffle his snuggle blanket!

It takes a while, but Oliver eventually recognises that sometimes the best way to deal with a negative (and rather unruly) situation is with head-on positivity. A resounding message to parents out there everywhere! With a kiss and prrr prrr (Grumble nice speak), Oliver and his Grumbles slip smiling into sweet slumber.

Mad Hatters Manly Yvonne's Book launch Nov 2015 (21) (480x640)Oliver’s Grumbles is a delightfully close up and personal look at dealing with emotions such as anger and frustration. And, a reminder to us all that, sometimes to change everything, you simply need to change your attitude. Mes uses narrative flecked with engaging alliteration and powerful verbs to reflective Oliver’s changing moods and growing frustrations.

 Giuseppe Poli’s line and pencil illustrations add whimsy and colour enough to keep young eyes glued to the pages until the very last grumble is dealt Mad Hatters Manly Yvonne's Book launch Nov 2015 (19) (480x640)with. I adore their bright orange angst reminiscent of Oliver’s hair, which alters bewitchingly to a softer shade of sky as they mellow from grrr to prrr.

The many subtleties of both text and drawings make this a winner for me. Recommended for grumbles under 10 or anyone having one of ‘those’ days.Olivers's Grumbles illos spread

 

Dragon Tales Publishing December 2015

 My brother Tom by Michelle Worthington and Ann-Marie Finn, is a heartfelt story ‘for older siblings of premature babies to help them make sense of what’s happening’, especially when they are confined to hospital.

It is also (for me) touching, tear-up material but beautifully absent of sentimentality, making it a fabulous go-to book to help littlies and biggies understand and cope with one of life’s more dramatic and stressful occurrences.

Michelle and Tom Worthington writes with honesty and quiet understanding having experienced the turmoil and anxieties of early births herself. Her narrative is direct and candid yet incredibly sincere and always kid friendly. While it may incline to tug at an adult’s heartstrings, My brother Tom establishes strong emotional connections for younger readers right from the start.

Tom’s brother observes not only his brother’s fight for life but also his parents’ emotional conflict as they worry and wait. His presence appears passive and helpless; a role many siblings must feel they are forced to adopt in situations like these. What his parents cannot know or see however, are the singing angels outside the window who give Tom’s brother the courage to believe things will get better and who follow little Tom, everywhere.

Ann-Marie Finn # 2Illustrated by Finn with extreme sensitivity and subtle colour change, this picture book affects a stirring sense of hope that radiates love and triumph. Highly recommended. Royalties from the sale of My brother Tom will be donated to Life’s Little Treasures Foundation.

Dragon Tale Publishing December 2015

Perhaps you know someone whose festive season will be less than tinsel-bright this year. You can bring some light into their hearts with picture books like these.

Ann-Marie Finn’s Sweet New Release; Gus the Asparagus

There are moments in life that make us stop and adjust our perspectives on the world. Even encourage us to see the world from another’s point of view. Author Kaylene Hobson and illustrator Ann-Marie Finn from Dragon Tales Publishing have achieved just that by introducing us to their new, loveable character, Gus. ‘Gus, the Asparagus’ is a story targeted towards children and families with an Autism Spectrum Disorder, promoting awareness through this valuable and entertaining resource.

IMG_8433Gus is a part of the Green Family. He is the only asparagus, but he doesn’t mind. Despite his differences, they love him anyway. But upon entering school, Gus finds it difficult to ‘fit in’ with the other fruits and vegetables. Cleverly, the story integrates some of the challenges that a child with Autism may face; like highly distracting birds and misunderstanding the rules in a ‘rolling’ race.
A diagnosis of ‘Asparagus Syndrome’ sees Gus finally thrive as others become more aware of his needs and help to make adaptations to his environment. And the best part is, Gus makes a friend who doesn’t mind his upside down, asparagus ways… being different is okay.

‘Gus, the Asparagus’ is a simple story that clearly defines its’ message of accepting differences in yourself and others, yet in a humorous, light-hearted manner. The mixture of explanatory narration and amusing dialogue is like watching a children’s television show! Whimsical, goggle-eyed characters and bright, bold colours that Ann-Marie Finn has illustrated perfectly suit the playful text by Kaylene Hobson.
A sweet, charming and significant book for families, teachers and specialists, and all primary school children to connect with, whether on the spectrum or not. ‘Gus, the Asparagus’ is sure to spear your hearts with its juicy goodness!

Ann-Marie Finn is a talented artist and author, having produced stunning books including ‘A Trip to the Moon’, ‘Captain Kieron’, ‘I Despair of My Hair’, and illustrations for ‘Isaac’s Dragon’ and ‘My Dad is a FIFO Dad’. I am fortunate to have had the opportunity to learn about Ann-Marie Finn’s fascinating journey to creating her books, including the scrumptious ‘Gus, the Asparagus’.

You have a gorgeous, eye-catching style of illustrating. Please tell us a bit about your artistic background. How did you come to illustrate children’s books?
Well I’ve been an illustrator since leaving college, and I always knew that I wanted to be a children’s book illustrator eventually. I started out designing greetings cards and stationery, and there was never really time to work on anything new. Then I left work to have my two children and I knew then that I had to just go for it! I took a story that I had written years earlier as a student, adapted it to be about my first little boy Liam, and A Trip to the Moon was created.  

Congratulations on the release of your latest book with Kaylene Hobson, ‘Gus, the Asparagus’! Can you tell us a bit about how you and Kaylene collaborated and what you hope the readers will gain from this book?
The reason Kaylene and I met was through a group that Kaylene set up to help kids on the spectrum to interact with each other. Once she found out I was an illustrator and I found out that she was an author we started talking about a collaboration. We completed Kaylene’s first book in July last year and haven’t stopped thinking up ideas since. When I first had the idea to make Gus the Asparagus a character I sent her a message. I knew she would either laugh and think I was crazy or decide it was a good idea and we should run with it! (She did both). The idea behind the book was to create a character that kids with autism could connect with and understand, a book for them to understand themselves rather than for adults. We also hoped it would be fun for any kids, not just those on the spectrum.  

How did working on ‘Gus, the Asparagus’ make you feel, considering the topic is so close to your heart? How does the story resonate with you personally?
I loved every moment of working on Gus. The best part was that we were never short of ideas! In fact we had too many and had to cut out some pages (good excuse for a sequel though…). Gus himself is very much like my eldest Liam, and he actually helped me out when I was illustrating the book and gave me ideas on what would make Gus more comfortable in class. I love it when my kids get involved in my work.  

Gus the asparagus picWe’ve seen a mixture of amazing artistic techniques across your books, including pencil sketching, collage and digital media. Do you have a particular style or type of medium that you tend to prefer over others? Describe the illustrative process you used for creating ‘Gus’.
When I see a manuscript or think up a character I can usually see it in my head before I start to work on it. I knew Gus needed to be a very simple but bright character, without fussy backgrounds. It didn’t take me long to get him right. The characters were created from painted colours on textured paper.  

51cO8B3DfnL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_ The pencil sketch style that I developed for A Trip to the Moon is my favourite though, I like that I get to draw it all by hand but have the ability to manipulate the images easily in Photoshop and keep the hand drawn look. I’ve used that technique in most of the books I’ve illustrated.  

What were the most rewarding and challenging aspects of creating the illustrations for this book?
The most rewarding part was when I got the look of Gus just right. Both Kaylene and I knew instantly when he was right, I think it’s his eyes that do it! There weren’t any real challenging parts to the illustrations, it’s amazing how easy it is to get the right expression on an asparagus!  

Do you like asparagus? What’s your favourite vegetable?
I love asparagus! Luckily the variety I eat doesn’t have saucer like eyes so I don’t feel like I’m doing anything wrong….  
Yes, I would consider asparagus to be my favourite 🙂  

You have authored and illustrated several children’s stories. Do you have a preference for a particular role in creating books for kids? Why?
Well I have never considered myself an author, just an illustrator. The fact that I have written 3 and a half of my own books doesn’t register really, but I think that’s all part of being an asparagus…  

What has been the biggest highlight for you since beginning your journey in the field of children’s literature?
The feedback is most definitely the best part of every book. I’m always a bit scared of doing book readings (I’m allergic to public speaking), but seeing the kids being interested in what I’m reading, pointing to the pictures and asking questions is amazing. It’s the whole reason I wanted to illustrate children’s books in the first place.  

51Mmu67oo-L._AA160_You have two new projects due out soon. Can you tell us a bit about the works you are creating with Georgie Donaghey and Michelle Worthington?
I have just finished Lulu by Georgie Donaghey and received the first copy a few days ago. It was a very challenging one for me because I decided to paint the illustrations this time. It’s very time consuming and less easy to correct if I make mistakes, so tougher when working to a deadline. In the end though I think I got it right and I’m very pleased with the final result.  

Angels Outside the Window is a gorgeous story by Michelle Worthington about her son’s experience with having a baby brother born prematurely. I am in the early stages with this one, trying to find the right style to work in. I want to keep it soft and dreamy; a sensitive style to go with a sensitive topic. Michelle is kindly donating profits from the sale of this book to the Life’s Little Treasures foundation, so it’s an extra incentive for me to get it just right!  

What does your art space look like? Creative clutter or meticulously organised?
It’s clutter central. Whenever it gets too much to cope with I panic and try to get someone to organise it for me. Kaylene has tried to empty my desk before, so has a professional de-clutterer. But it still ends up the same way. I can draw pretty pictures but I can’t for the life of me put something back where it belongs!!  

Is there anything else about Ann-Marie Finn that you can share with us? Something we won’t find on the internet!
Hmmmm, I think you might have guessed by now that I’m a bit of an asparagus 😉  

Thanks so much for talking with me, Ann-Marie! It’s been a blast!

Connect with Ann-Marie Finn:
www.amfillustrations.wordpress.com
www.facebook.com/amfillustrations
www.dragontalespublishing.com.au

World Autism Awareness Day was celebrated on April 2nd this year. You can find more information about the cause here.

PhotoGrid_1428985506739
To WIN a copy of ‘Gus, the Asparagus’, head to the Gus the Asparagus Giveaway!
Entries close 9pm (AEST) Sunday April 26th 2015.

Magical Moments for Mum – Mother’s Day Reviews

Dear Mums, whether you begin it with burnt offerings and flowers in bed or embark on a 24 respite from the usual onslaught of bickering and demands, you are celebrating Mothers’ Day because you are part of one of the most magical clubs in the world. The following assortment of picture books, all out now, encapsulates that magic. They are in equal parts cute, absorbing, whimsical and funny.

 

How I love youYoung children under five are well catered for. How I Love You by Anna Pignataro (Scholastic Press, March 2014) oozes tenderness and charm. What it lacks in narrative depth is more than compensated for by the understated beauty of Pignataro’s glorious illustrations. Children will enjoy mimicking the high-lighted prose as they visit a diverse collection of Aussie animals at bedtime, each revealing by their actions just how they love their mummies. Sweet and perfect for bedtime togetherness.
Mummy You're Special to MeSimilar in design and content is Laine Mitchell’s and Kim Fleming’s, Mummy, You’re Special To Me. (Scholastic Australia, April 2014). Again this is less of a story and more of an exploration of the divine diversity and uniqueness of mummies all over the planet.
Little Giraffe thinks his mummy is super special because she’s ‘kind’ and ‘strong as a knight’. As he navigates through life, he discovers a universe of other mummies each with their own special qualities. My favourite encounter was sipping tea with Little Camel’s hip and groovy Gran.
Some of Mitchell’s rhyming verse felt a little off key at times but Fleming’s adorable, multi-technique illustrations were special enough to send me right back to the beginning to enjoy it all over again.

Hootie the CutieHootie the Cutie (New Frontier Publishing, April 2014) by Michelle Worthington and fresh newcomer to the children’s book scene, illustrator Giuseppe Poli, could as easily be enjoyed by dads and grandparents but deserves special mention here, because what mum does not welcome a little dragon magic in her day?
Worthington weaves a winsome, whimsical woodland tale about an owl, small in stature but large in heart and spirit, and brave beyond all measure as it turns out. Poli completes the very pleasing tapestry with illustrations that will enchant the pants off you.
Hootie the Cutie reminds us that sometimes loving (our children) is about allowing for growth and letting go while simultaneously showing pre-primary aged children that independent thought and actions are qualities that can shape and strengthen who you really are. Highly commendable.
Jam for NanaNanas are high-profiling a lot these days and little wonder when grandparents make up the highest proportion of informal childcare in Australia according to (AIFS)* statistics; so Deborah Kelly’s and Lisa Stewart’s, Jam for Nana (Random House Australia, April 2014) is destined to be a generational crowd pleaser.

This picture book delights on many levels; from its dustcover-covered, recipe-book shape and size to its comforting unrushed rhythm and wholesome narrative. It is a book you’ll want to treasure, or at least share with your little one and their significant grandparent. Told from a little girl’s point of view, it highlights the special bond between her and her grandmother and centres on her desire to recreate ‘real jam’ for her nana.
It reminded me of a time in my childhood when backyard apricots tasted like ‘the warmth of a hundred summers’ too and life was full of substance so pure and thick and wonderful, you could ‘hold it upside down and shake it’. Stewart’s divine illustrations and Kelly’s shared pancake ritual make this one very special picture book.
Nurturing and snuggling are all well and good but bringing a smile to mum’s face is perhaps the best thing you can give her. My Mum says the Strangest Things, (Black Dog Books, April 2014), is guaranteed to have her LOL in no time flat. In fact, I can barely get through it (with my Miss 8) without crippling waves of laughter washing over me.
ThMy Says the Strangest Thingse Katrina Germein and Tom Jellet team that gave us My Dad Thinks he’s Funny and My Dad Still Thinks he’s Funny, train their humorous cross-hairs on mum’s idiosyncratic refrains this time, with deadly accuracy. For adult readers, the sweet irony of mum’s idiomatic expressions is difficult to ignore and impossible not to relate to: ‘when mum’s tired she says everyone needs an early night.’ Love, love, love it! There is something here for every member of the family. Older primary aged kids will be rolling their eyes and trying not to laugh. You’ll be taking stock of the next ‘strange thing’ that falls out of your mouth.

 

So, however you end up spending Mothers’ Day, make sure you take a moment or two to share it with the little people who gave you the reason to read picture books again in the first place (and linger longer in bed for at least one day of the year). Happy Mothers’ Day!

* AIFS.gov.au viewed Feb 2014.

 

Doodles and Drafts – An interview with Michelle Worthington

Welcome 2013! No bangs and whistles to launch the New Year this time. No arm-long lists of resolutions (fitted most of them on the back of my hand). Time to just buckle in, knuckle down and devote more hours to all those things we should actually be devoting more time to. One of them being more posts!

And so I embark on what I affectionately term Doodles and Drafts: snap-shot peeks at some of our most notable and most inspiring authors and illustrators. Some you will know intimately already, some are not so well-known but are creating impressive upward spirals; because all great writing starts with that first scrawled idea and all wonderful art begins as a mystic scribble… We kick off with a Drafter.

My first encounters with children’s author Michelle Worthington were at the usual haunts; children’s writing festivals and conferences. I was struck by her vivacious zeal and enthusiasm when asked anything about the craft of creating children’s stories. I’m delighted to feature this young, vibrant writer in my first author interview. Enjoy.Promo Photos 001

Who is Michelle Worthington? Describe your writerly-self for us.

My name is Michelle Worthington and I am a published Australian author. The stories I write are like the stories I used to read when I was little and they have what may now be seen as an old fashioned feel, but they have a timeless message. My goal is to be a successful Australian author known for uniquely Australian, classically elegant and compassionate stories for young children.

You’re a published author of several titles. What are they?

Picture book, The Bedtime Band, illustrated by QLD wildlife artist Sandra Temple was released by Wombat Books in November 2011.

Adult nonfiction book Practically Single was released by Mostly for Mothers Publishers in June 2012.

Picture Book, The Pink Pirate, published by Little Steps Publishing in July 2012, illustrated by New Zealand artist Karen Mounsey-Smith.

Yellow Dress DayPicture Book, Yellow Dress Day published by New Frontier Publishing in September 2012 which is illustrated by emerging NSW artist Sophie Norsa.

Why do you enjoy creating picture books? What other genres in children’s writing interest you?

As a mother of two rapidly growing boys, I am often asked why I write picture books for young children, especially young girls. The answer is simple; believe it or not, mothers were once little girls. More than that, I am a mother who wants my sons to grow up and marry strong, independent women. I write stories that empower little girls to believe they can be anything they want to be, as long as they believe in themselves. We live in a world where children are often asked at quite a young age to decide who they want to be. I want the children who read my books to decide to just be themselves. I would like to write a chapter book for boys one day.

 We know you love high heels but what’s your favourite colour, why and how has it influenced your writing?

My favourite colour is pink, of course. I love pink shoes.

Your recent release of the picture book “The Pink Pirate” was written for you niece. What message did you want to convey to her and your readers with this book?

The Pink Pirate was written for my niece, Georgia. I wanted her to know that she could be anything she wanted to be, regardless of her gender or the opinions of others. Books teach us so much about ourselves, the world we live in and the world that exists in our imagination. Every time you read a good book, you should get just a little bit smarter. It is very important not to underestimate the intelligence of the next generation, but at the same time, it is even more important that we pass on the right messages and lessons to them, in a way they will accept and understand.pink pirate

What does the term, ‘Power of Pink’ mean to you and why is it important for you to relay this belief to young readers?

There are not enough picture books that allow girls to be the hero of their own fairytale. Our children are growing up in a different world and they need to learn how to save themselves, instead of waiting to be saved. Writing my adult non-fiction fiction book about my divorce taught me that.

What inspires you to write? People, places, occasions…

I love writing stories for my family and friends, because I get my ideas from them. Words are like music to me. The right combination can sing in your brain as you read aloud. I write my books with that in mind. Books are best shared and if the reader enjoys telling it, it gives so much more pleasure to the listener. It is very important for me to feel like I am fostering a love of words and appreciation of good writing in my readers.

Where is your favourite place to create stories?

Practically SingleI write stories in my head all the time. They tumble around in my head until they are ready, then I write them down on anything I can find; bus tickets, napkins, back of my hand. Being a busy mum, it is hard to find an exact time to spend writing, so I let the ideas flow when and where they will.

Is illustrating your own picture book stories something you’d ever contemplate?

I can’t even draw stick people, so no. But I love working on books with talented illustrators, it makes the experience doubly delicious.

What is the one thing that motivates you to keep on writing (for children)?

I believe in the power of words, the power of sharing and the power of hope. Picture books encompass all these things and they are the perfect medium for teaching children about different people, places and challenges that they wouldn’t normally experience in their day to day life. I am not a doctor, scientist or any other professional that could help make a difference in the lives of children with disabilities. I am a writer. I can only use the gifts I have been given to help others to the best of my ability. If we all focus on what we are good at, we can all help each other in our own special way.

What is on the horizon for Michelle?

I am working on my first book app called Captain Cody, another picture book about the ocean, a fairy book with magic sparkles and a book about blended families, all to be released in the next 18 months. Watch this space; you never know what I will get up to next.

About Michelle

Best described as an Australian author with a penchant for high heels, Michelle is passionate about her kids and what she writes for them and kids like them. She’s won several poetry awards and is a regular presenter at schools and early learning centres.

Mini review of The Pink Pirate– Miss 6

Did you like the book? “Yes!”

What was the best bit?  “The girl saved the ship.”

What message do you think there was? “That girls can’t be pirates, but they can! When they grow up they can be whatever they want.”

Would you change anything in the book? “That the girl didn’t have to fight Blackboots, because she could have been hurt.”

Anything else you want to say about the book? “The two mice and the cat were doing swords as well.” (so clearly mice and cats can be anything they want to be too)