Curious Concepts – Concept picture book reviews

Concept picture books play a huge part in shaping a young person’s perceptions. They are capable of unlocking an inquisitiveness that hopefully sticks around for life and are crucial for developing critical thinking, reasoning, and logic. However, important educational concepts need not be strictly didactic and dull as these entertaining picture books clearly display.

Garden FriendsGarden Friends by Natalie Marshall is a Touch and Feel board book, sturdy and bright in appearance in the same vein as the That’s not my… series. This one directs 0 – 3-year-olds to experience their tactile investigations within a garden setting using short verb orientated phrases – ‘Duck is quacking!’ It’s joyous and sensual and a nice shift from the usual ‘touch and feel’ concept.

The Five Mile Press March 2016

Counting Through the DayCounting Through the Day by Margaret Hamilton and Anna Pignataro escorts pre-schoolers through a typical day from sunrise, to breakfast, to visits with Nanna and finally back off to bed. Along the way, our young protagonist gently encounters many fascinating objects and situations from two sturdy feet to five broody hens and even ‘thousands of raindrops falling from the sky’. And as children are wont to do, they count each and every one of them.

Hamilton’s gently rhyming verse and affecting choice of counting objects harness a child’s every day pleasures, highlighting the world around them: their toys, meals, the weather and so on. Numbers 1 – 11 are shown numerically and in words while Pignataro’s combination of drawn, painted, and collage illustrations are simply marvellous. The end pages alone will provide hours of delight and interest.

Counting Through the Day is as much about story as it is about learning to count. I love that readers are taken past the obligatory ‘10’, and are introduced to 11, 20, hundreds and even millions, exposing young minds to a universe of infinite possibilities. Easy to grasp and absolutely beautiful to enjoy.

Little Hare Books imprint HGE 2016

For someone whose spatial awareness is not as sharp as it could be, the next two picture books are a real boon. They encourage an understanding of the relationship of objects to oneself and in ones world in a clever and entertaining way that ensures high levels of reader investment and interest.

The Shape of My HeartThe Shape of My Heart by Mark Sperring Illustrated by Alys Paterson is a board book sized banquet of colour, shapes, and rhymes; images guaranteed to captivate 0 – 5-year-olds. This is no ordinary ‘this shape is a…’ book. It expands the notion of appearance and form by depicting the most obvious shape to start with – you and me. From there, readers are shown the various shape of parts of our anatomy (eyes, mouth, feet) the environment in which they live (sun, houses) and those shapes that inhabit the world with them (birds, vehicles, creatures in the zoo) and so on. I love how the shape you can hear with (ears for instance) leads to a myriad of other shapes that make up our existence. Sounds confusing to describe but not to behold and read thanks to Paterson’s cheerful and shapely illustrations. Reminiscent of Mem Fox’s Where is the Green Sheep? in parts, The Shape of My Heart combines visual literacy, introduction of sounds, and rousing vocabulary whilst neatly implying that everything that shapes our lives fits within our hearts and you can’t get any more spatial than that. Highly recommended.

Bloomsbury for Children February 2016

What Could it BeWhat Could it Be? by Sally Fawcett is a fascinating picture book initiative combining the best bits of storytelling, creative stimulation, and subliminal learning. Displayed in complementing double page spreads, Fawcett gently introduces young readers to some well-known geometric shapes and colours. Pre-schoolers and early primary schoolers may already be loosely familiar with shapes such as circles, ovals, and even octagons. They are probably discovering the mysteries of an artist’s palette, as well but in What Could it Be?, they are challenged to delve deeper, look more closely and investigate the world of possibilities surrounding them.

With the help of, a young boy named Max, readers are prompted to answer the ‘what if’ inspired notion to think outside of the box and tap into their creative souls. Each page of story is gloriously illustrated by Fawcett who cleverly secretes dozens upon dozens of obviously hidden aspects in each scene to be discovered by roving little eyes. I say obvious because this picture book adventure serves to show that every conceivable form, colour and object in our worlds are there for us to find if we just look hard enough and perhaps use a little imagination.

Children will delight in the seek and find quality of What Could it Be?. In addition, this book has far-reaching usefulness in homes, schools, and early learning centres. I see a future for it in home schooling, too as it fosters a genuine exploration and appreciation of the world around us. At the book’s conclusion, children are invited to go one-step further and are encouraged to think, experiment, create, and share for themselves.

Unleash your child’s creativity with this one!

EK Books June 2016

#ByAustralianBuyAustralian

#BooksCreate

 

 

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Twice as Sweet – Picture Books by Mem Fox

Mem Fox is a legendary and much-loved Australian author, filling our homes with love and joy for more than 30 years. Just as endearing as her beloved iconic possum tale, Mem Fox introduces us to yet another two marvellous stories of fun, rhythm, exploration, imagination and reassurance.

imageThis & That with Judy Horacek, Scholastic Australia, October 2015.

When this quintessential duo that brought us classics including Where is the Green Sheep? and Good Night Sleep Tight pair up once more, you know you’re onto a winner. Little ones will be instantly drawn in by the appealing colours and cuteness gracing the cover and opening page. They’ll just as willingly be pulled along with the stimulating, repetitive phrase, “I’ll tell you a story of this, and I’ll tell you a story of that.” But the attraction doesn’t stop there. This is an adventurous and lively story of an adult and child journeying across wondrous lands and amongst exotic creatures and people. In collaboration, Horacek‘s illustrations present a spectacular array of colour, life and energy that you can’t take your eyes away from.

When mother and baby ‘rat‘ embark on their quest in a little, green box, you’ll never be more surprised at the fun that follows. Each turn, cleverly rhyming with the word ‘that‘, thrusts this pair into a new, imaginative scene. From encountering a chimp with a magic ‘hat‘, racing boys and their ‘cat‘, crazy giraffes on a ‘mat‘, kings and queens who ‘chat‘ and speckled hens who are terribly, terribly ‘fat‘. But at bedtime, with a twist of the recurrent phrase, mother safely settles her bub after this busy day with nothing other than a goodnight ‘kiss‘.

imageMem Fox‘s expert use of language keeps her listeners engaged until the very end. Together with Judy Horacek‘s child-friendly, bold and romping drawings, this book is a pure delight. There are a multitude of opportunites for little ones to use their imaginations, to explore the hidden, and familiar, details (including the subtle visual rhyming link of the main characters, and a well-known ball of wool!), and to simply just enjoy the ride.

This & That’ will have toddlers and preschoolers jumping at the chance to jaunt with these nimble rats again and again, knowing there is always a soft place to fall when the excitement is over.

imageNellie Belle with Mike Austin, Scholastic Australia, January 2016.

Again, utilising her winning formula of repetition, questioning and interactivity, Mem Fox introduces us to another fun-loving, audacious character in ‘Nellie Belle’. With a completely different illustrative style to Judy Horacek’s, Mike Austin‘s textured digitally-rendered images are certainly no less vibrant and engaging.

The sway of the verse is reminiscent of an old childhood song, and the illustrations have that retro-feel pop to them, too!

“Is it fun in the yard, Nellie Belle, Nellie Belle? Is it fun in the yard, Nellie Belle?”

imageWhen this canine pal catches a glimpse of the outside world through the fence, the michief begins. First she buries her beloved Ted amongst the flowers, then heads out to meet and greet some new faces in the street and on the beach. Playing chasey games with the seagulls and ball games with a seal, soon her fun is dampened. Nellie Belle finds herself confronted in a deep, dark spot amongst glaring possum eyes. In an energetic scamper back through the big, wide world, this spooked pup races straight into her bed (not before retrieving Ted from the yard, of course!).

The words and pictures marry beautifully with their crisp, patterned and cheery commonalities. ‘Nellie Belle’ is a vivacious read-aloud book that is perfect for toddlers eager to become their own independent, confident beings, with that added reassurance that their piece of comfort is always within reach.

To support Australian authors and Australian book stores, such as Boomerang Books, please share this post with the hashtag #ByAustralianBuyAustralian. Read more about it here.

‘Balm for the Soul’ – Summer holiday Reviews

Parachute Nintendo gameSummer school holidays for me are childhood memories of searing hot days in a sun-shrivelled backyard, homegrown apricots cold from the fridge after a swim in the above ground pool, and losing myself for hours on end in stories. What are your perfect summer holiday memories? Chances are your children’s summers are crystallising into something unforgettable as we speak and although game-playing is much more sophisticated and consuming than my days on the old Game and Watch Nintendos (Go Snoopy Tennis and Parachute!), here’s hoping story books still play a significant role in their holiday adventures. Here are some outstanding titles that are perfect for sharing these holidays. Picture books, yes, but hum dingers they are!Perfect

For the freedom seekers…

I am falling more in love with and in awe of Danny Parker’s work with each new release. Perfect, illustrated by Freya Blackwood wildly perpetuates this love affair. As revealed in a recent seminar, Parker uses song-like nine syllabic rhyming verse (akin to kuji mantras) to eloquently describe three children’s summer place and activities. It’s superbly simple and concise yet captures each moment of the children’s life with astounding alacrity. They lounge in the sunshine, mix and make, break and create. They meander and breathe, soar and believe until storm clouds pen them indoors. Their days are full of scheming, with nights of ‘beautiful dreaming’.

Perfect Illos spread # 2 Perfect, quite simply…is. Crisp, clean and wholesome smudged with daring that belies the adventure of the children’s days. Summer essence is beautifully bound together with Blackwood’s timeless pencil and acrylic painted illustrations; delicate and creamy, exuding a fullness of spirit that only children with no restraint of time or imagination possess. A perfect portrayal of freedom and joie de vivre. Better than Nintendo! Read more about these two creators and Perfect in Romi’s post, here.

Little Hare Books Hardie Grant Egmont October 2015

Australian Kids through the YearsFor reminiscing…

Another better than perfect picture book to place up front and foremost on your bookshelves this summer is Tania McCartney’s and Andrew Joyner’s, Australian Kids through the Years. This is blindingly brilliant. At first, I had a niggling concern that the target audience (5 – 8) might suffer some disconnection with the past, it being so far away from yesterday for them and their collected reference frames, but I was happily wrong on this account. My Miss 9 adored every page, every era, every word, and every image (yes, even the 80s) of this unreal expose of kids’ lives from the very first inhabitants to present day. What they ate, wore, played, and Australian Kids Years illo spreadeven read is faithfully recounted in kid-friendly pictures and bubble boxes. There’s a real personal intimacy with the kids from each time period created by McCartney’s short and sweet vignettes so joyfully illustrated by Joyner. (His illustrations smack of Little Golden Book, old-world charm – a perfect match for the text).

So much more than a catalogue of that-was-then facts, Australian Kids Through the Years brings hysterically accurate information right back into our lives (hysterical because I still own a Walkman) and is absolutely brilliant to share with today’s Z Generation. My Miss Z revelled in the revelations. (Yes, Mummy really did love her dragster bike). A must for homes and schools, and late-20th Century tragics like me. You’ll be digging out your Nintendo after reading this, too!

Australian Kids Year illo spread # 2Timelines and listings of illustrations are all faithfully included, as well. Read Joy Lawn’s Aussie round up on good reads, here.

National Library of Australia October 2015This & That

For the littlies…

It’s been a little while since the Mem Fox / Judy Horacek duo joined forces. Not since their Where is the Green Sheep? have I read a picture book so many times in one sitting. Happy to report some fresh material is now available to rest your sheep-weary sensibilities and, ironically, Horacek’s iconic sheep make a fleeting cameo in, This & That.

Essentially a tale for the under fours, This & That is robust and short enough to go a few (dozen) rounds at bedtime. Fox focuses her balanced prose with simple rhyme and rhythm mixing fantastical improbabilities with silly acceptability. They are stories, made up for your amusement after all. Horacek’s clean-lined illustrations embellish the possibilities even further. I love her use of pinging colour and light and shade.

This & That has a vaguely familiar feel to it but it’s a formula that works a wonder, if Green Sheep is anything to go by. Not all of Fox’s work works for me but this one has been worth the wait. Guaranteed to be the new go-to bedtime favourite these holidays.

Scholastic Australia October 2015

For the thinkers…River Riddle

If you’re anxious about your kids’ minds slipping in a soporific summer stupor fear not, this fun picture book, River Riddle by first time team, Jim Dewar and Anil Tortop will keep them (and you) engrossed in many minutes of contemplative thought, or in my case many many many minutes. You see, this tale is based on the well-known kids’ logic puzzle and those two words (logic and puzzle) reside uncomfortably in my head. I just find this difficult! That is not to say, impossible. Dewar’s clever rhyming quatrains ably set the scene and pace for Jack whose aim is to make it to the market with his bag of hay…on the other side of a deep wide river.

River Riddle illosHis companions, a fox called Frank and a sheep called Dolly are not to be trusted on their own so in spite of a small boat being available for their river crossing, the dilemma of whom to row across first and whom to leave on shore till later arises. Turns out, Jack is smarter than I am and solves his river riddle but does he make it to the market in time?

Tortop’s kid-cute digi illustrations are boisterous, bright, and cheery. My primary schooler had loads of fun recreating this story and acting out ‘the crossing’ with her toys in a mathematical logical way; again, I had to leave the room so confused did I become. This is the kind of holiday pre-occupation you’d pay for, am I right. Great for small minds and big thinkers.

Scholastic Australia August 2015

If none of these holidays reads suit you, discover more here at the Kids Holiday Reading Guide 2015 – 2016.

To all who have read, wept and laughed at my words and those of so many others this past year, a heartfelt THANK YOU. Have a great Festive Season and a safe, story-filled New Year! I’m off to scoff a few fruit mince pies and of course, keep on reading!

 

 

 

 
 

 

Brilliant Brisbane Writers Festival 2015

The BWF shone again. Jon Ronson’s opening address wooed everyone and we bought a copy of The Psychopath Test on the spot. What a funny, clever man.

CollinsI realised on opening night that this was my 10th consecutive year moderating sessions at the BWF. What a privilege to have conversed with writers such as Booker shortlisted authors Abdulrazak Gurnah and Michael Collins over the years.

Another past highlight was when I chaired the phenomenal Andy Griffiths speaking to an adult audience. He morphed into Vincent Price and Struwwelpeter. I’ve never seen him as funny. I chaired a couple of sessions with Boy in the Striped Pyjamas author, John Boyne the same year, and he got to share the electricity of the stage with Andy for that memorable panel. John’s upcoming Boy at the Top of the Mountain is incredible, by the way. It will be published in October.Mountain

Other years it was a privilege to speak with Hungarian holocaust survivor Peter Lantos, and to listen to Gabrielle Carey and Linda Neil share how they grieved for their mothers.

I almost swooned when invited to facilitate the session with the brilliant Margo Lanagan and Marianne de Pierres. And Morris Gleitzman and Gabrielle Wang were another unforgettable pairing.

The incomparable Michael Morpurgo (War Horse) was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to speak one-on-one with an author I have admired greatly for years. He was such a gentleman. NZ writer Kate di Goldi was delightful and, last year, Nick Earls was a load of laughs. Mem Fox (Possum Magic) was the very first author I chaired at the BWF, back in the days of tents. There have been many, many special sessions, a number of which I was called in to chair at late notice and had to wing.

A final past highlight was ‘African Stories’ with Caine Prize winners EC Esondo Waiting, and Kenyan Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor. This session was recorded by ABC Radio National http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bookshow/brisbane-writers-festival-african-stories/2973532

RosieThe 2015 sessions were right up there too. I was thrilled to moderate three separate sessions with one author in each, beginning with the inimitable Graeme Simsion talking about The Rosie Effect. Graeme delighted in his audience and met many of them in the queue beforehand and then in the auditorium before the session began. He even beat me to it and jumped on stage to introduce me! I loved how he answered the questions with clarity and stayed on topic. I won’t give away his excellent tips on how to write comedy. The Rosie Effect also deals with big issues. The audience loved him. So did I.

Forever YoungMy second session was with 2014 PM Literary Award co-winner Steven Carroll. I was quaking because his new novel Forever Young is the best literary fiction I’ve read this year and he is such an eminent author (see *below) but we hit it off straight away with a shared interest in art and music (even though I disgraced myself on stage with an innocent question about the song Please Please Me. Unfortunately Steven wouldn’t sing the Dylan version of Forever Young but in every other way he exceeded expectations with his answers to my questions. This was a session of profound insights as well as lots of laughs. I’m now reading through the rest of his stunning Glenroy series.

ShiningMy last session was with Somali refugee Abdi Aden. Abdi enthralled the audience with his powerful story in Shining: The Story of a Lucky Man, which tells how he escaped from soldiers in Somali and his torturous journey to a refugee camp in Kenya and then to Romania, Germany and Australia. I have never seen an audience with such anguish in their faces as they listened to Abdi speak about what it’s like to be a refugee. Abdi recognises the generosity of the Australian people in giving him the opportunity to shine here.

 

Other authors I admire and had a moment to speak with in passing were Cass Moriarty, Briony Stewart, Felicity Plunkett and Christine Bongers (too quickly!) and I know I have forgotten to mention some – apologies.

I also met Richard Glover when I inadvertently mistook him for an *eminent writer of literary fiction. I’ll be hearing Richard speak about Flesh Wounds soon and know he will be hilarious.

Thank you to the wonderful publicists from the publishing companies and the staff and volunteers of the BWF who looked after us all so well. Our minds are now wide open!

G Simsion

Anything but Boring – A collection of Board Book reviews

I’m not sure how or why but I’ve still got many of the board books of my childhood and now, those from my daughter’s early learning days.Big Book of Silly

Their very construction may have something to do with standing up to the test of time. Maybe, I just can’t bear to part with them because of what they represent, an intensely intimate time of shared firsts, revelations, and discoveries.

Board books not only symbolize these never to be repeated phases of a child’s development but also crucially supply growing intellects with those first initial stepping stones towards visual and verbal literacy.

Here are some fun newbies to add to your collection.

Big Book of Silly illo spreadBig Books by Natalie Marshall. I absolutely love the look and feel of these large format board books. The Big Book of Silly allows pre-schoolers to revel in the surreal and silly, like a rhino eating three hundred jellybeans before bed for instance (however perhaps this is not as silly as it sounds to a child). As with the Big Book of Happy, it is illustrated with loud colour-filled pages of big bold characters prompting very young readers to question their own happy and silly moments. Too much fun to pass up.

The Five Mile Press May 2015

Cheeky Monkey manners Lisa Kerr is another Aussie author whose Cheeky Monkey Manners builds on her Cheeky Monkey series character and uses vibrant full-page colour to harness young attention spans.

Cheek Monkey spreadCheeky Monkey is not so much rude as ‘unknowing’ and with the help of his extremely tolerant jungle pals eventually comes to understand and use his ‘please’ and ‘thankyous’ correctly.

Repeating scenarios and a square compact size makes these books idea for introducing and enforcing manners in pre-schoolers.

The Five Mile Press May 2015

Magic Car Wash seriesAnother vibrant set of books perfectly suited for fledging imaginations is the Magic Car Wash series, a family collaboration by Rosie Smith, Bruce Whatley, and Ben Smith Whatley.

Kit the mechanic owns a car wash and small but eclectic fleet of vehicles in the town of Tyre Flats. (Don’t you love the connections?) The thing is, whenever the cars drive through the car wash, magical things happen; front and back ends mix and match resulting in some curious combinations…and adventures.

Magic Car wash illo spreadBeginner readers will get a real buzz of out these Transformers meets Cars tales. They provide the idea vehicle from which to explore concepts of fear, friendship, spatial awareness and direction, and the benefits of working together to achieve great results. I adore the simple colourful graphics, exploration of language and brilliant little twisty endings of these books. Robust (super thick glossy pages means these books will last for a long time on the book shelves of even the most active readers) yet cute enough to win over boys and girls, and hopelessly appealing, the Magic Car Wash series is another great example of board books on offer from The Five Mile Press May 2015. Titles include The Giant Mouse, The Runaway Car and Red’s First Fire.The Giant Mouse

Lastly but not least (there are still so many to fawn over) a little bit more magic…Possum Magic. Mem Fox and Julie Vivas have joined formidable forces again to develop a series of beautifully bound board books aimed at pre-schoolers and based on their perennial picture book favourite, Possum Magic. Animals led the way, now followed by, Actions, an exploration of ‘doing’ words.

Possum Magic ActionsWords that inspire action in various modes are lovingly represented by Vivas’ cheerful illustrations. Familiar yet brimming with new eye-catching detail, each spread features two different verbs demonstrated by those endearing Possum Magic bushland characters we’ve come to love.

If you like eating (lamingtons), reading (in comfortable places) and dancing (under starlit skies), you will love Possum Magic, Actions and so will little ones aged 0 – 4 years of age.Possum Magic Opposites Possum Magic Numbers

Scholastic Australia 2015

Pig Kahuna PiratesHere’s another hot off the press. Pig Kahuna Pirates! by author illustrator, Jennifer Sattler just corkscrewed its way across my desk. This chunky little board book follows in the wake of Pig Kahuna and Sattler’s previous Chick ‘n’ Pug picture book creations. Goofy, cutesy characters bounce through seemingly parochial situations yet inspire adventure and genuine expressions of love.

chick n pugThe porcine brothers, Fergus and Dink spend a day at the beach together  caught in a world of pirates and brotherly disagreement until Fergus realises the value of his baby brother. Heavily textured illustrations ably capture the emotions and the ambient beauty of the day. A great board book addition for those with siblings under 5 years old.

Bloomsbury Children’s Books July 2015

 

Christmas Collectibles

One NightA plethora of picture books about Christmas are published each year. Some are froth and bubble, as unsatisfying as cheap tinsel. Others are excellent, and should be shared with children and families in the lead-up to Christmas Day or join the collections of  avid Christmas book collectors.

Some standouts for 2014 that are already available are One Night by Penny Matthews and Stephen Michael King (Omnibus Books, Scholastic) and The Christmas Rose by Wendy Blaxland and Lucy Hennessy (Walker Books Australia). One Night is an Australian retelling of the birth of Jesus. Stephen Michael King’s illustrations illuminate this miraculous event. The Christmas Rose is a beautiful piece of art and writing which tells the story of a girl who follows the shepherds and the star to the stable to give the Saviour a gift.

Christmas Rose

 

A fun Australiana addition to Christmas this year is Colin Buchanan, Greg Champion and Glenn Singleton’s Deck the Shed with Bits of Wattle (Scholastic). It comes with a bonus CD. Effervescent musician and writer, Buchanan, is accumulating a significant body of work for children. Seek him out.

Some older titles for Christmas book collectors and aficionados that are worth a look if you haven’t already come across them are –

Applesauce and the Christmas Miracle by Glenda Millard and Stephen Michael King (who also illustrated One Night), a very Australian story which achieved the distinction of being a CBCA shortlisted book, rare for a ‘seasonal’ book.

The ABC Book of Christmas is distinctive because it features art by Australian illustrators, including Stephen Michael King (the king of Australian Christmas illustration), Ann James, Judith Rossell, Wayne Harris, Greg Rogers and Anna Walker.

Jesus’ Christmas Party by Nicholas Allan, is a very funny account of the birth of Jesus, told from the grumpy innkeeper’s point of view. For those scratching their heads for Christmas play ideas, this book can easily be adapted as a performance or readers’ theatre. The Nativity Play by Nick Butterworth and Mick Inkpen would also be helpful to read during the festive season. And Mem Fox and Kerry Argent continue the nativity play theme with the Australian contemporary classic, Wombat Divine.

jesus' christmas partyA Christmas Story by eminent UK illustrator, Brian Wildsmith, tells the Christmas story from the point of view of a girl and donkey. Other high-quality picture books told from animals’ perspectives are On This Special Night by Claire Freedman and Simon Mendez; and the original, humorous, The Lion, the Unicorn and Me by esteemed author Jeanette Winterson, illustrated by Rosalind MacCurrach.

British artist, Christian Birmingham has illustrated some sumptuous Christmas books including The Night Before Christmas and A Christmas Carol. P.J. Lynch has also illustrated Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol exquisitely.

A Small Miracle by Peter Collington was shortlisted for the Kate Greenaway Medal and is a contemporary Christmas parable.

Newbery medal winner, Kate DiCamillo has crafted a profoundly moving story of a girl who cares for a stranger at Christmas time in Great Joy. It is superbly illustrated by Bagram Ibatoulline.

And The Tale of the Three Trees, retold by Angela Elwell Hunt and illustrated by Tim Jonke, beautifully combines the Christmas and Easter stories.

Tale of the Three Trees

Number 1 – Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books

Advent Calendar Christmas Countdown

Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books #1

Possum Magic by Mem Fox and illustrations by Julie Vivas

We surveyed our customers to discover the Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books of all time – we’re counting down the Top 24 Kid’s Books between now and Christmas Eve…

 

78.7% of all respondents have read this book themselves, or read this book to their children.

 

 

Number 8 – Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books

Advent Calendar Christmas Countdown

Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books #8

Where is the Green Sheep? by Mem Fox and illustrations by Judy Horacek

We surveyed our customers to discover the Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books of all time – we’re counting down the Top 24 Kid’s Books between now and Christmas Eve…


45.6% of all respondents have read this book themselves, or read this book to their children.

Number 14 – Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books

Advent Calendar Christmas Countdown

Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books #14

Time for Bed by Mem Fox and illustrations by Jane Dyer

We surveyed our customers to discover the Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books of all time – we’re counting down the Top 24 Kid’s Books between now and Christmas Eve…

 

37.5% of all respondents have read this book themselves, or read this book to their children.

 

Number 15 – Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books

Advent Calendar Christmas Countdown

Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books #15

Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes by Mem Fox and illustrations by Helen Oxenbury

We surveyed our customers to discover the Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books of all time – we’re counting down the Top 24 Kid’s Books between now and Christmas Eve…

36.4% of all respondents have read this book themselves, or read this book to their children.

 

Number 23 – Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books

Advent Calendar Christmas Countdown

Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books #23

Koala Lou by Mem Fox and illustrations by Pamela Lofts

We surveyed our customers to discover the Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books of all time – we’re counting down the Top 24 Kid’s Books between now and Christmas Eve…

30.8% of all respondents have read this book themselves, or read this book to their children.

 

Number 24 – Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books

Advent Calendar Christmas Countdown

Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books #24

Shoes from Grandpa by Mem Fox and illustrations by Patricia Mullins

We surveyed our customers to discover the Most Popular Aussie Kid’s Books of all time – we’re counting down the Top 24 Kid’s Books between now and Christmas Eve…

30.8% of all respondents have read this book themselves, or read this book to their children.