Queensland Literary Awards 2012 shortlists announced

The shortlists for the Queensland Literary Awards for 2012 have been announced.  Here are the nominees!

Fiction book award

  • The Chemistry of Tears (Peter Carey, Penguin)
  • All That I Am (Anna Funder, Penguin)
  • Sarah Thornhill (Kate Grenville, Text)
  • Autumn Laing (Alex Miller, A&U)
  • Cold Light (Frank Moorhouse, Random House)

Science writer award

  • Seduced by Logic (Robyn Arianrhod, UQP)
  • Gone Viral (Frank Bowden, UNSW Press)
  • Sex, Genes & Rock ‘n’ Roll (Rob Brooks, UNSW Press)
  • Australia: The Time Traveller’s Guide (Richard Smith, ABC Books)

Nonfiction book award

  • The People Smuggler (Robin De Crespigny, Penguin)
  • Double Entry (Jane Gleeson-White, A&U)
  • Riding the Trains in Japan (Patrick Holland, Transit Lounge)
  • Worse Things Happen at Sea (William McInnes & Sarah Watt, Hachette)
  • Her Father’s Daughter (Alice Pung, Black Inc.)

Emerging Queensland author – manuscript award

  • Scratches on the Surface (Aaron Smibert)
  • Home Mechanics (Luke Thomas)
  • Island of the Unexpected (Catherine Titasey)
  • Hidden Objects (Ariella Van Luyn)

David Unaipon Award for an unpublished Indigenous writer

  • Story (Siv Parker)
  • Hard (Ellen van Neerven-Currie)
  • My Journey that May Never End (Dorothy Williams-Kemp)

The Harry Williams Award for a literary or media work advancing public debate

  • Too Much Luck: The Mining Boom and Australia’s Future (Paul Cleary, Black Inc.)
  • The Australian Moment: How We Were Made for These Times(George Megalogenis, Penguin)
  • There Goes the Neighbourhood (Michael Weley, UNSW Press)

Judith Wright Calanthe Award – poetry collection

  • The Welfare of My Enemy (Anthony Lawrence, Puncher & Wattman)
  • Outside (David McCooey, Salt Publishing)
  • Late Night Shopping (Rhyll McMaster, Brandl & Schlesinger)
  • Crimson Crop (Peter Rose, UWA Publishing)
  • The Yellow Gum’s Conversion (Simon West, Puncher & Wattman)

History book award

  • Seduced by Logic (Robyn Arianrhod, UQP)
  • 1835: The Founding of Melbourne and the Conquest of Australia(James Boyce, Black Inc.)
  • The Biggest Estate on Earth (Bill Gammage, A&U)
  • The Censor’s Library (Nicole Moore, UQP)

Children’s book award

  • The Horses Didn’t Come Home (Pamela Rushby, HarperCollins)
  • Brotherband 1: The Outcasts (John Flanagan, Random House)
  • Look a Book! (Libby Gleeson & Freya Blackwood, Little Hare)
  • Ten Blue Wrens (Elizabeth Honey, A&U)
  • Kumiko and the Shadow Catchers (Briony Stewart, UQP)

Young adult book award

  • Night Beach (Kirsty Eagar, Penguin)
  • The Ink Bridge (Neil Grant, A&U)
  • Three Summers (Judith Clarke, A&U)
  • Sea Hearts (Margo Lanagan, A&U)
  • All I Ever Wanted (Vikki Wakefield, Text)

The Steele Rudd Award for an Australian short story collection

  • Silence (Rodney Hall, Murdoch Books)
  • Shooting the Fox (Marion Halligan, A&U)
  • In the Shade of the Shady Tree (John Kinsella, Swallow Press, Ohio University Press)
  • The Weight of a Human Heart (Ryan O’Neill, Black Inc.)
  • Forecast: Turbulence (Janette Turner Hospital, HarperCollins)

Television script award

  • The Straits: ‘Yawor – My Lovely’, episode 3 (Blake Ayshford, Matchbox Pictures)
  • The Slap: ‘Harry’, episode 3 (Brendan Cowell, Matchbox Pictures)
  • Strange Calls: ‘Phantom’, episode 3 (Anthony Mullins, Hoodlum Active)
  • Mabo (Sue Smith, Blackfella Films)
  • Dance Academy: ‘The Prix de Fonteyn’, episode 24 (Liz Doran, Werner Films)

Drama script (stage) award

  • War Crimes (Angela Betzien)
  • Bloodland (Wayne Blair)
  • Taxi (Patricia Cornelius)
  • Baby Teeth (Rita Kalnejais)
  • A Golem Story (Lally Katz)

Film script award

  • Dead Europe (Louise Fox, See-Saw Films)
  • Being Venice (Miro Bilbra, Dragon Net Films)
  • Rarer Monsters (Shane Armstrong & S P Krauss)
  • Save Your Legs (Brendan Cowell, Robyn Kershaw Productions).

BOOKS ALIVE

Books Alive, an Australian Government initiative, aims to encourage all Australians to turn off their screens and get reading.

In choosing to purchase one of its “50 Books You Can’t Put Down”, you are eligible to receive a FREE book – either a dazzling collection of brand-new short stories by ten of Australia’s best writers, or Grug Learns to Read, a new title in the classic Australian series.

50 Books You Can’t Put Down

The Book of Rapture by Nikki Gemmell
The Slap by Christos Tsiolkas
The Lieutenant by Kate Grenville
The Rip by Robert Drewe
Dead Man Running by Ross Coulthart & Duncan McNab
The Scarecrow by Michael Connelly
Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts
Too Close to Home by Linwood Barclay
206 Bones by Kathy Reichs
Shatter by Michael Robotham
How to Break Your Own Heart by Maggie Alderson
Dear Fatty by Dawn French
The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer & Annie Barrows
Parky: My Autobiography by Michael Parkinson
The Greatest Show on Earth by Richard Dawkins
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
Through a Glass Darkly by Caroline Jones
Heart and Soul by Maeve Binchy
The Young Widow’s Book of Home Improvement by Virginia Lloyd
The Vanishing Act of Esme Lennox by Maggie O’Farrell
The Night My Bum Dropped by Gretel Killeen
To Love, Honour and Betray by Kathy Lette
The True Story of Butterfish by Nick Earls
Occy by Mark Occhilupo & Tim Baker
True Colours by Adam Gilchrist
A Most Wanted Man by John le Carré
A Fraction of the Whole by Steve Toltz
Australian Tragic by Jack Marx
Pacific Fury by Peter Thompson
1788 by David Hill
My God! It’s a Woman by Nancy Bird
The People’s Train by Tom Keneally
The 19th Wife by David Ebershoff
Dog Boy by Eva Hornung
The Story of Edgar Sawtelle by David Wroblewski
Wanting by Richard Flanagan
Dark Country by Bronwyn Parry
A Beautiful Place to Die by Malla Nunn
It’s All Too Much by Peter Walsh
The Host by Stephenie Meyer
Brisingr by Christopher Paolini
Finnikin of the Rock by Melina Marchetta
Eagle Day by Robert Muchamore
Robot Riot! by Andy Griffiths
Somebody’s Crying by Maureen McCarthy
Pearlie in the Park by Wendy Harmer
The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
The Nixie’s Song by Tony DiTerlizzi & Holly Black
From Little Things Big Things Grow by Paul Kelly & Kev Carmody
Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes by Mem Fox & Helen Oxenbury

The Indigenous Literacy Project Launch

“This project is a real opportunity for all Australians to get involved in a simple, effective and meaningful community activity. I encourage you, your school, your bookclub, or your organisation to be involved.”
– Thérèse Rein, Patron

This morning, I attended the launch of Book Buzz, an initiative of the Indigenous Literacy Project, at Customs House:

Unfortunately, this is the last photo my camera took before it decided to kick the proverbial bucket and only take corrupted .jpgs, something I only realised five minutes ago. Anyway, it was a great morning (and for the record, I took some great photos), with guests including Kate Grenville and Thérèse Rein. The Indigenous Literacy Project really is a worthwhile cause, one that Boomerang Books is proud to support.

I have an illiterate grandmother, and I know how frustrating life can be for her. She’s in her seventies, and she can’t read prescription labels on medication, street signs, or even her own name on letters. Her education was interrupted by World War II, and after that, she migrated to Australia. Luckily, she has her children, and grandchildren, and neighbours, and friends, to help her. In some indigenous communities, this support network doesn’t exist. And it isn’t a one-off event like the War that only causes illiteracy in one generation, as was the case with my grandmother, it is continued illiteracy, generation after generation. The Indigenous Literacy Project aims to raise literacy levels and, in turn, improve the lives of these Indigenous Australians living in remote and isolated regions.

This is done by providing books and literacy resources to indigenous communities and raising broad community awareness of indigenous literacy issues.

“Disappearing into a book and into someone else’s world and into another story is a great joy. And for me having three children, one of my joys was to drop down to browse in our local bookshop and to find great books with them.”
– Thérèse Rein, Patron

In 2007 and 2008, the Project raised over $500,000, and aims to raise another $250,000 in 2009.

To learn more about the Indigenous Literacy Project, or to make a donation, you can visit: http://www.indigenousliteracyproject.org.au