Kate Simpson Shares her Story on Finding Granny

 Finding Granny is a touching and heartwarming story about a young girl dealing with her Granny’s stroke, yet underneath the surface it so much more about the emotional impact it has on every character in the book, and even those behind the scenes. Granny’s convalescence is beautifully captured through the uplifting illustrations and the playful tone in which the story is told. The words were artfully written by debut author, Kate Simpson; mum, writer, engineer and podcaster, who joins us as a part of her blog tour to talk about her journey thus far. Thanks, Kate! 🙂

Thanks for talking with us, Kate, and congratulations on your debut picture book, Finding Granny!
Can you tell us a bit about your background and how you came to be a children’s writer?

I didn’t always dream of being a writer. I always loved books and thought it must be amazing to be an author, but it simply didn’t occur to me that this was something I could do. I felt like writing was something for people with ideas, and I didn’t have them.

When my children were born, I took maternity leave with each, and then worked part time. With less happening at work, I started looking for something more to challenge me intellectually and creatively. Because my own children were so young, I was reading mountains of wonderful picture books and somehow, something just clicked and I thought that perhaps writing for children could be the thing I was looking for. And it was.

What does having Finding Granny published mean to you? How do you hope it will touch its readers?

It’s incredibly exciting to have a book published and to be able to see it and touch it and read it to my children. Like many writers, I’ve been chipping away at this over a number of years and it’s such a thrill to see the fruits of my labour in physical form.

In terms of how it might touch its readers, I feel like it’s the type of book that may find a different place in each reader’s heart depending on their own experience. A family touched by stroke or by another illness or disability might get different things out of Finding Granny than a family with different experiences. But I hope that the love between Edie and Granny really shines through for everyone and that the emotion of the story rings true.

Do you have any personal experience with art therapy? How much research did you need to undertake in developing your story, combining the emotional and physical impact a stroke has on a person, and how art therapy can aid in their recovery?

I don’t have any experience of art therapy. In fact, in my first draft of Finding Granny, Granny underwent physiotherapy rather than art therapy. But I just couldn’t find a way to bring out Granny’s playfulness in that setting in the way that I wanted. I don’t remember how the idea of art therapy came to me, but I remember doing a quick Google search and finding a news article from the UK about an art therapy group for stroke survivors that was holding an exhibition. From there, it just clicked.

I did do a little bit more research after that. There’s not a great deal of detail in my book, but I wanted to be sure I wasn’t including any glaring factual errors. It was also interesting to read people’s personal stories of creating art after stroke. Some were already artists, who needed to re-learn their skill with their non-dominant hand after the dominant hand was affected by stroke. Others had never had any experience of art before beginning art therapy after stroke. I came across a few news articles and blog posts that included photos of the art work created, and I was blown away.

As a first time author, how did you find the publishing process with EK Books? Were there any surprises or challenges along the way?

I really didn’t know a huge amount about the process going in. The few things I’d gathered from conferences and friends were that it would be slow and that I would be involved very little. Largely, I suppose that was true. There were certainly gaps of many months where I heard nothing at all. But I was pleasantly surprised to find that my publisher at EK Books did consult me on the choice of illustrator and that I was given the opportunity to comment on the roughs. As for the waiting, it seems like that’s just part of every stage of the publishing journey. It’s excruciating, but it can’t be avoided.

Gwynneth Jones is obviously a talented illustrator, absolutely capturing the heart, joy and love in Finding Granny. What was it like collaborating with her, and what do you love most about the way she has portrayed your sensitive story?

What’s not to love about Gwynne’s illustrations? I remember in the early days, my publisher emailed me some rough pencil sketches that Gwynne had done of Granny and Edie, and I was just over the moon. She has really brought the characters to life and I just can’t imagine them any way other than as she has drawn them. That’s definitely the thing I love most about her work.

In some ways collaboration seems a strange word to use for the process of creating a picture book. Of course, in the end the words and text work together to create the reader’s experience of the book, but as the book is created we really work largely alone. I created the text before Gwynne was involved at all, and most of her work was done independently of me as well. The publisher did give me the opportunity to comment on the roughs, and I made a couple of comments, but I don’t remember asking for any substantial changes (Gwynne may remember it differently!).

Do you have a favourite memory with one of your grandparents?

Many! My maternal grandmother lived with us for much of my childhood, and I remember her fretting over us climbing trees and jumping over rocks. My sister and I took positive delight in terrorising her with our exploits, but now that I have kids of my own, I can absolutely understand where she was coming from!

You’re one of the trio in the popular podcast for kids, One More Page. Has there been a stand out moment, or piece of advice from a guest that changed you or your thinking, or reinforced what you do as a children’s writer/presenter?

I think the biggest thing I’ve taken away from the podcast is how incredibly supportive the children’s book community is. We’ve had organisations like the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators going out of their way to promote what we’re doing, and established authors and large publishers really getting on board to be part of our interviews and our Kids’ Capers segment. And then of course there’s the constant cheer squad of emerging writers, teachers, librarians and general book lovers who listen to the show and share it on social media, tell their friends and send us messages via our website. It’s such a delight to be a part of such a wonderful community.

Anything else of excitement you’d like to add?

Everything seems a little bit exciting at the moment. I’m doing my best to remember it all so that I can feed off that in the moments when I’m alone in my lounge room tearing my hair out over my latest manuscript. I have another couple of picture books coming out over the next two years, and I also have some ideas for some middle grade novels that I’m keen to get started on. I’m really hoping to build this little spark of success into a career.

Thanks so much for the interview, Kate! Congratulations again on your new release, Finding Granny, and enjoy the rest of your book blog tour!

Join the tour here. 🙂

Find ‘Finding Granny’ in Dimity’s reviews here.

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Empowering Inspiration – Picture Book Reviews

The following picture books possess special qualities in their ability to address difficult topics, but in most sensitive and inspiring ways. From the team at publishing company, Empowering Resources, here are three valuable resources that can literally change the lives of many dealing with tough life circumstances.

imageThe courageous and talented Naomi Hunter, founder of Empowering Resources has brilliantly delivered these touching tales to the world. Her first authored book, A Secret Safe to Tell, explores the delicate issue of childhood sexual abuse, based on a troubling time from her past. With beautifully gentle illustrations by Karen Erasmus, this book is one of comfort and encouragement in feeling safe enough to trust in seeking help.

Children who are victims of abuse understandably are confused when fun, warm love and a special relationship with someone they know turns into a period of awkwardness, hurts and threats. Even though this is what they are told to believe, abuse is never their fault. When the little girl in the story eventually faces her fears and exposes her secret to the flowers and birds, she is serendipitously blessed with a new, colourful heart and the power to be free…

Unsurprisingly shortlisted in the 2015 Australian Book Industry Awards, A Secret Safe to Tell has brought about a revolution of support for this initiative and has helped many around the world share their stories and lift their heavy burdens in order to heal. It has also already been, and will continue to be a fabulous, ’empowering resource’ for early years educators and parents to teach their children about body safety, appropriate interactions with older people in their lives, and that it is ok to tell.

Read more in my interview with Naomi Hunter.

imageNaomi‘s most recently published book, Even Mummy Cries, explores the emotional rollercoaster that often accompanies families on their journey that is life. Whatever the type of struggles being faced, it is perfectly normal, and healthy even, to have an outlet for the internal battles we are dealing with. For this heart-rending and reassuring story, the soft watercolour and pencil illustrations by Karen Erasmus are suitably gentle, visually captivating and highly impactful.

The children in the story just adore their fun mummy, who loves them back “more than a GAZILLION BILLION TRILLION plus INFINITY.” But when she reverts to a sad and lonely place, and EXPLODES with tears in the middle of the night, the kids feel a sense of hopelessness and a deep sting in their hearts. Until the tears stop…

imageAt the very heart of this book is the security for its readers; Mums, you are not alone. Kids, well, you just do what you do and your mummies love and treasure you no matter what! With beautiful sentiments, Even Mummy Cries is another important book for primary school aged children to understand some of life’s complexities without feeling guilt, and the power for parents to be able to share their pressures in sensitive ways without feeling shame.

Read more about Naomi Hunter’s inspiration for this story here.

imageYou’re Different, Jemima! explores self-expression, individuality and self-assurance. Written with gusto, just like the nature of our main character, Jedidah Morley sends a positive and nurturing message that standing ‘loud and proud’, and just being yourself is more than ok. I particularly like the colour variations that Karen Erasmus uses to highlight the scenes of imagination and personality as opposed to the overall sense of uniformity.

Jemima’s teacher, Mrs Smith and the other students degrade her for ‘colourful’ and unique ways of expressing herself. It is her eccentric-looking duck picture that has everyone, including Jemima, questioning her sense of belonging. But when Mrs Chuckles takes over teaching the next day, Jemimah’s self doubt is put to rest and her ‘differences’ are celebrated.

You’re Different, Jemima! is a refreshing story for preschoolers that allows and encourages individual personalities to shine as bold and bright as they can be.

The Empowering Resources website with all their current and upcoming books can be found here.

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