The Naked Boy and the Crocodile

A Wiltija

Recently my 15 year-old son had a life changing experience. He spent 3 days with a group of 20 teens from his school doing voluntary work at a remote aboriginal community.

They built a Wiltija to provide shade for the elders. They built 5 park benches and did many other small tasks around the community.

They met wonderful people and experienced a way of life that most people never see.

The Indigenous Literacy Foundation is allowing us all to share the kind of things my son experienced through The Naked Boy and the Crocodile, Stories by children from remote Indigenous communities.

The stories are funny, fascinating and scary and each page is uniquely illustrated. There are thirteen stories about life and the things that happen.

This wonderful book is edited by Andy Griffiths who says,

In this book there are stories about the simple pleasures of playing with friends, riding motorbikes, picking berries and hunting for emu eggs and wild pigs sitting alongside tales of terrifying turkeys, angry mamus, farcical football matches and crocodiles with an unfortunate – but completely understandable – preference for eating naked people.

The Naked Boy and the Crocodile is a project of the Indigenous Literacy Foundation and aims to improve literacy in remote Indigenous communities around Australia.

When you buy this unique book you’ll be helping the Indigenous Literacy Foundation but you’ll also be experiencing something unique.

The Naked Boy and the Crocodile belongs in every Christmas stocking.


Indigenous Literacy Day – 40% of takings to be donated this Wednesday

Indigenous Literacy Day is on this Wednesday, 1 September 2010.  Boomerang Books is a supporter of this fantastic program – this year we will be donating 40% of all takings (not profits or margin) to the cause.  You can help us to help indigenous readers by buying a book from Boomerang Books on Wednesday.

For more information, check out the Indigenous Literacy Day website:

http://www.indigenousliteracyproject.org.au

What’s it all about?

Can you imagine not being able to read a newspaper, a road sign or directions on a bottle of medication? Sadly, this is a reality faced by many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders living in remote communities today.

The Indigenous Literacy Project (ILP) aims to raise literacy levels and improve the lives and opportunities of Indigenous Australians living in remote and isolated regions.

This is done by providing books and literacy resources to Indigenous communities and raising broad community awareness of Indigenous literacy issues.

What happens on Indigenous Literacy Day

  • Events and fundraisers are held across Australia.
  • Participating publishers donate 5% (or more) of their takings from their invoices on ILD.
  • Participating booksellers donate 5% (or more) of their takings from sales on ILD.
  • Participating schools host The Great Book Swap and other fundraising activities.
  • Participating businesses, clubs and organisations host The Great Book Swap and other fundarising activities.
  • Across Australia people attend ILD events including local Great Book Swaps, purchase books at participating bookshops or organise their own private fundraising literary lunches and morning teas.
  • People everywhere pause to read to support Indigenous literacy.

Boomerang Books salutes you

Boomerang Books would like to acknowledge David Gaunt, Karen Williams and all of the Indigenous Literacy Project committee members, staff and supporters for their work on this great cause.

Indigenous Literacy Project

Video courtesy of: Eden Media

Frequent readers of the blog will know that Boomerang Books is a proud supporter of the Indigenous Literacy Project. On September 2, 2009, we will be donating 10% of proceeds from book sales to the cause, so if you’ve been holding out on a particular purchase, and you want to do your part to help close the gap and improve Indigenous Literacy, drop by the store.

About the Indigenous Literacy Project

The Indigenous Literacy Project (ILP) is a partnership between the Australian Book Industry and The Fred Hollows Foundation.  

Working closely with the Australian Booksellers Association and the Australian Publishers Association, The Fred Hollows Foundation purchases and supplies books and other culturally appropriate learning materials to remote communities where The Foundation works.  Communities select and order reading material from catalogues and sample books provided by The Australian Booksellers Association.  The Fred Hollows Foundation staff also identify other literacy needs.  The books are then supplied to schools, libraries, early learning centres such as crèches, women’s Centres and other identified institutions, to enhance their pool of literacy resources.

For more information on the Indigenous Literacy Project, click here.

The Indigenous Literacy Project Launch

“This project is a real opportunity for all Australians to get involved in a simple, effective and meaningful community activity. I encourage you, your school, your bookclub, or your organisation to be involved.”
– Thérèse Rein, Patron

This morning, I attended the launch of Book Buzz, an initiative of the Indigenous Literacy Project, at Customs House:

Unfortunately, this is the last photo my camera took before it decided to kick the proverbial bucket and only take corrupted .jpgs, something I only realised five minutes ago. Anyway, it was a great morning (and for the record, I took some great photos), with guests including Kate Grenville and Thérèse Rein. The Indigenous Literacy Project really is a worthwhile cause, one that Boomerang Books is proud to support.

I have an illiterate grandmother, and I know how frustrating life can be for her. She’s in her seventies, and she can’t read prescription labels on medication, street signs, or even her own name on letters. Her education was interrupted by World War II, and after that, she migrated to Australia. Luckily, she has her children, and grandchildren, and neighbours, and friends, to help her. In some indigenous communities, this support network doesn’t exist. And it isn’t a one-off event like the War that only causes illiteracy in one generation, as was the case with my grandmother, it is continued illiteracy, generation after generation. The Indigenous Literacy Project aims to raise literacy levels and, in turn, improve the lives of these Indigenous Australians living in remote and isolated regions.

This is done by providing books and literacy resources to indigenous communities and raising broad community awareness of indigenous literacy issues.

“Disappearing into a book and into someone else’s world and into another story is a great joy. And for me having three children, one of my joys was to drop down to browse in our local bookshop and to find great books with them.”
– Thérèse Rein, Patron

In 2007 and 2008, the Project raised over $500,000, and aims to raise another $250,000 in 2009.

To learn more about the Indigenous Literacy Project, or to make a donation, you can visit: http://www.indigenousliteracyproject.org.au