Digital diary dates for 2012

Photo: Wolf Concepts' award-winning Caesar's Filofax ad (www.wolfconcepts.com).
Have you started filling in key dates for 2012 in your digital diary yet (read on for a list of ebookish events)?

I switched to using Calendar on the iPhone earlier this year and still miss my Filofax terribly. I am convinced that the act of physically writing an event into the diary ensures its details are etched into my memory too. Typing something in via a touchscreen doesn’t seem to have the same effect at all.

In fact, I’ve just read a blog post that explains why this is indeed the case very well, here on Lifehacker.com:

“With writing, you use your hand to form the letters (and connect them), thereby more actively engaging the brain in the process. Typing, on the other hand, involves just selecting letters by pressing identical-looking keys.”

The trouble is, the Filofax is too heavy to carry around everywhere, whereas the iPhone is always on hand. Sigh.

But back to key dates. There are already plenty of 2012 dates for digital publishing fiends to add to their diaries, written or otherwise. Here are just a few for you to ponder entering:

  • The Australian Society of Authors’ E-Exchange forum, February 18, Sydney, with other states to follow through the year.
  • Copyright Agency Limited member seminar and digital publishing guide launch, including guest speakers Mark Tanner (Google eBooks) and Sabine Heindl (NBN Co) February 23, State Library of Victoria, Melbourne.
  • Perth Writers Festival, February 10-March 3.
  • Adelaide Writers Week, March 2-18, 2012
  • The Australian Society of Authors’ Creating and marketing an app, March 16, Sydney, with other states to follow.
  • Creating your own ebook workshop, March 23-24, Melbourne, with other states to follow.
  • Sydney Writers Festival, May 14-20.
  • Australian Publishers Association’s ebook essentials for editors seminar, June 5 (Sydney) and June 7 (Melbourne).
  • Australian Booksellers Association annual conference, June 17-18, Sydney.
  • Emerging Writers Festival, TBA June, Melbourne.
  • How to publish your ebook course, University of Technology, Sydney, Tuesdays, 6-8pm, from mid-year with dates TBC.
  • Australian Society of Authors’ How to publish your ebook – six-week course (identical syllabus to UTS course above), from July 4, Sydney.
  • Australian Publishers Association digital marketing seminar, July 5 (Sydney) and July 10 (Melbourne).
  • Byron Bay Writers Festival, August 3-5.
  • Melbourne Writers Festival, August 23-September 2.
  • Brisbane Writers Festival, TBA September.
  • Various must-attend if:book events, dates and venues TBA.

    I’ll try to keep this page (and my iPhone calendar) up to date as the year goes on, and hope to see you at some of these events.

  • The D Publishing furore, exciting Earls news and if:book’s ebook

    So, surely the digital publishing world is winding down for Christmas? The list of announcements and industry stoushes must be coming to an end? Nope, not if the buzz around D Publishing’s contracts, Exciting Press’s Nick Earls deal and if:book Australia’s first ebook are any indication.

    According to Crikey’s new Lit-icism blogger, Bethanie Blanchard, the furore over Dymocks’ D Publishing venture’s author contracts continues. She provides an excellent analysis here. D Publishing is a new venture for the book retailer, launched only a few weeks ago. Bookish social media users have been in a flap ever since with warnings for authors over what has been described as “Australia’s worst publishing contract”.

    I haven’t seen one of the contracts, but would argue that any author can negotiate with any prospective publisher, and if that publisher won’t budge on clauses of concern, then they’re probably not going to care much about the author and their book/s in the future either, so the author should look elsewhere. Smashwords might be a good start, though it is possible to go it alone too. Services like BookBaby and Lulu are other options to consider.

    If they’ll have you, the mainstream publishers still seem to be the best bet in terms of creating a professionally edited, well-designed and marketed product, though Australia’s own Nick Earls has just spurned the legacy publishers to sign a 12-book digital distribution deal with a small US start-up, Exciting Press. Bet they’re excited!

    Meanwhile, the good people at if:book Australia have just published a free ebook, Hand Made High Tech, containing ten essays from Australian writers on the future of books and reading in a digital world. It’s edited by if:book Australia manager Simon Groth, and published using the WordPress-powered PressBooks platform. You can download it free for Kindle, as an ePub file for your e-ink reader, as a PDF, or read it online. There’s a hashtag, #ifbookessay, so you can join the conversation while reading too.

    The opening chapter is by Associate Professor Sherman Young, author of The Book is Dead, Long Live the Book (UNSW Press 2007) and Media Convergence (Palgrave, 2011). I haven’t yet read the latter, but recommend the former to anyone who is interested in the future of the book. Sadly, it is not available as an ebook, but you can order the print version. It’s a very beautiful object as far as printed book go.

    I’m looking forward to reading the second chapter, by Australian publishing veteran Peter Donoughue, the former managing director of John Wiley & Sons Australia blogs about industry developments at Pub Date Critical. It was one of his posts that finally helped me get my head around the wholesale versus agency models for book distribution.

    The other essayists are author John Birmingham, founder and CEO of Norg Media Bronwen Clune, digital poet Jason Nelson, journalist, novelist and podcaster Myke Bartlett, comics guru Jackie Ryan, writer and game developer Paul Callaghan and author of the Writer’s Guide to Making a Digital Living Christy Dena.