Australian Graphic Novels for Christmas

KidglovzGraphic novels for children and young adults are not just comics. Many do have the highly visual elements of comics: multiple panels on a page and text in speech bubbles; but graphic novels are books rather than magazines and come in diverse forms. Many picture books include what I regard as the fundamental element of a graphic novel: framed (or even unframed) panels.

Some book buyers may be wary of buying graphic novels for children, assuming that the content may be ‘graphic’. Of course, content in graphic novels can be ‘graphic’ in the sense of ‘explicit’ but graphic also implies ‘visual’ and it doesn’t take long to flick through a graphic novel aimed at children to check that the content is age appropriate.

How the SunBob Graham is known as one of Australia’s best picture book creators for children. Have a look at most of his books and you’ll notice that many pages are composed as framed panels (pictures inside boxes). Graham’s most recent book is How the Sun Got to Coco’s House (Walker Books). By the second double page, Graham’s story splits into a framed and unframed wide panel showing the sun over an icy horizon. Then it becomes a full double-page spread to show the immense size of a whale, before breaking into three different-sized panels. Graham’s masterful composition and form create a unique reading and viewing experience.

boy bear

Another Australian master of the graphic novel in picture book form is the incomparable and fondly remembered Gregory Rogers. His award-winning ‘Boy’ series, beginning with The Boy, the Bear, the Baron and the Bard (Allen & Unwin) has recently been published as a trilogy. Encourage young readers to explore Rogers’ Shakespearian London and Renaissance Europe. His colour, verve, humour and innovation are breath taking.

TeddyNicki Greenberg is also recognised as a world-class Australian creator of graphic novels. Her latest book, Teddy Took the Train (Allen & Unwin), is intended for younger readers than some of her others such as Shakespeare’s Hamlet and The Great Gatsby, and is ably reviewed here by Dimity Powell.

Australian publisher of Indigenous literature, Magabala Press, is publishing Australia’s first Indigenous graphic novel trilogy. It’s by Brenton E McKenna and begins with Ubby’s Underdogs: The Legend of the Phoenix.Ubby's Underdogs

This has recently been followed with Ubby’s Underdogs: Heroes Beginnings. The stories are set in Broome and will particularly appeal to readers in upper primary and junior secondary school (about 10-14 years). McKenna is a very popular and dynamic figure at writers’ festivals.

KidGlovz (A&U) is written by Julie Hunt and illustrated in black and white by Dale Newman. This is an exquisite collaboration about a young musical prodigy, Kidglovz, who is virtually a prisoner of his uncle and forced to practise and perform the piano. He hears sounds as music and is befriended by tightrope walker, Shoestring, who tries to help him. Kidglovz stands alongside Brian Selznick’s books such as The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Wonderstruck  and The Marvels.

Forces of Nature – Picture Book Reviews

The scent of Spring is in the air. But that’s not all that’s lifting us up. From the tiny details to the wider world, our environment has so much to offer. For different reasons, these following picture books discover beauty and how the elements of nature can capture our hearts and strengthen our human kindness.  

imageHow the Sun Got to Coco’s House, Bob Graham (author, illus.), Walker Books, 2015.  

I patiently awaited its arrival. Now I’ve had my fix, and… it was worth the wait. This one effectively enlightened all my senses. With Bob Graham‘s natural poetic writing style, philosophical touch and emotive images, ‘How the Sun Got to Coco’s House’ is another classic to soothe the soul.  

In a consecutive movement, similar to the styles of ‘Vanilla Ice Cream’ and ‘Silver Buttons’, the story takes us on a journey with the sun around the globe. Starting from behind a snow-capped mountain, the sun begins to rise, giddily skidding across waters, catching glimpses in eyes, footsteps, aeroplane wings and over cities. In and out of proximity, the sun’s rays meet a vast array, from individuals, to small villages, and whole countries. Until, it barges in through Coco’s window. The sun becomes one with her family and friends, bringing with it a sense of togetherness, comfort and warmth.  

A gentle story of life, responsibility and peace, this book is adorned with Bob Graham’s characteristically whimsical and magical illustrative style, with a beautiful lolloping pace. ‘How the Sun Got to Coco’s House’ is a valuable asset aimed to inspire young readers to explore global environmental and social issues, as well as one that will simply light up their world! Once again, Bob Graham…brilliant!  

imageSeagull, Danny Snell (author, illus.), Working Title Press, 2015.  

Danny Snell brings us a heartwarming story of humanity and freedom, making clear our responsibility for appreciating the natural world around us.  

Beautifully descriptive yet simple language and serene backdrops allow its readers an intimate experience as a seagull tries to free herself from a tangled fishing line. Unable to loosen it herself, Seagull initiates help from the other creatures around the beach, but to no avail. The further she tarries, the heavier her load becomes as she catches a manner of litter in the line. Finally, it is the silent observer that enables Seagull’s wings to spread, and her heart to sing once more.  

Snell has cleverly and effectively used mixed media to differentiate between the elements of natural versus man-made / fragile versus harmful with paint for the scenery and animals, and colourless scanned images for the items of rubbish. His artwork is stunningly textured with varying sky hues to represent the passing of the day and the exhaustion, and eventual freedom, of the defenceless bird.  

‘Seagull’ is a gentle and significant story for primary school aged children to be aware of environmental issues and aims to empower control, kindness and compassion for our planet and our future. Definitely one that will pull on your heartstrings.  

imageOllie and the Wind, Ronojoy Ghosh (author, illus.), Random House Australia, 2015.  

Here’s a cheeky story of one force of nature; the wind. Treating the gust as an anthropomorphic, invisible being, young Ollie interacts with it in creative ways, hoping to be reunited with the hat and scarf that were snatched from him. Upon discovering that the wind is not naughty, but in fact playful, Ollie gestures some of his favourite toys. A nighttime kite-flying romp sees Ollie and the wind form a special bond, which, by the looks of the final image, seemed to put the wind in high spirits.  

The text is full with depth and life, and is accompanied by vibrant, textured and jovial illustrations. Ghosh‘s fine line drawings, minimal colour palette of bold greens and golds with statements of red, and cartoonesque style qualify for a unique and captivating reading experience.  

‘Ollie and the Wind’ will capture more than just your heart. It will encourage preschoolers to look at the world with a fresh perspective, investigate studies of meteorology, and explore friendships on another level.