Feeling Good – Books to Increase Awareness

Getting to know oneself and understanding the world that shapes us is one of the first steps to feeling good about oneself and the world in which we live. This handful of books addresses the art of awesomeness and why it’s important to live it.

It’s OK To Feel The Way You Do by Josh Langley

Langley’s little books of BIG messages about self-help and self-esteem are house favourites. Neither overtly moralistic nor sermonic, they present beautiful messages of love, understanding and hope, accompanied with novel, cartoon-esque illustrations.

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What Is It? Fables & Parables For All Readers

Today I thought I’d take a closer look at the differences between fables and parables and come up with some recommendations for readers of all ages who enjoy a little learning with their leisure.

A fable is: a short story that conveys a moral to the reader, typically with animals as characters.

A parable is: a short story designed to illustrate or teach some truth, religious principle, or moral lesson.

FablesThe Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly

The first fable that comes to mind is the story of the hare and the tortoise who race each other. Everyone knows this one, the race seems unfair in the beginning because the hare is so fast, but he becomes smug knowing he’s going to win and takes a break to rest. Meanwhile, the slower tortoise continues to plod along and cruises past for the win. The moral of this fable is: slow and steady wins the race. If you want to teach your young ones this lesson, then check out The Tortoise and the Hare by Gerald Rose or Tortoise Vs Hare the Rematch by Preston Rutt and illustrated by Ben Redlich.

Most iconic of all is the collection of fables collated by the slave and storyteller Aesop in ancient Greece, of course it’s Aesop’s Fables. Check out this hardback edition of Aesop’s Fables illustrated by Ernest Griset, it contains more than 300 stories bound to please.Watership Down by Richard Adams

For YA and adult readers looking for a good fable to read, there’s: The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly by Sun-mi HwangCharlotte’s Web by E.B. WhiteWatership Down by Richard Adams and of course Animal Farm by George Orwell.

Parables
Recently I read The Pearl by John Steinbeck, which started me off thinking about parables and fables in the first place, and is about greed. Having said that, the first parable that comes to mind for me is The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. This book that has sold millions of copies all around the world, and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it a few years ago.

Those looking for religious principles in their reading would do well to check out The Shack by William P. Young, it’s a real life-changing read. The Richest Man in Babylon by George S. Clason is a collection of parables set in ancient Babylon based around financial wisdom and how to achieve wealth and financial independence.The Richest Man in Babylon by George-S.-Clason

A parable that’s on my TBR list is A Christmas Carol by none other than Charles Dickens. Even though I already know what the parable is, I still think it’d be nice to read it in the lead up to Christmas this year.

So, what’s your favourite fable or parable? Have any of them changed the way you think about the world? I’d love to know, so tell us in the comments below.

Reconciliation Week Reviews

Narragunnawali’ – peace, alive, wellbeing and coming together. A word that lies at the heart of Reconciliation in Schools and Early Learning and aims to ‘increase respect; reduce prejudice and strengthen relationships between the wider Australian community and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.’ With National Reconciliation Week in full swing (27 May to 3 June), it’s high time we celebrate the wealth of gifted indigenous artists that go to great pains to share their histories and cultures. Here is but a smattering of titles that embrace imagination and time honoured fable telling.Stories for Simon # 2

Although not of indigenous background, debut picture book team, Lisa Miranda Sarzin and Lauren Briggs have united to produce Stories for Simon, ‘a story of a shared dream and bright future’.

Simon is your typical Sydney nine-year-old boy who one day, through his show and tell presentation, stumbles upon the moment in history when an apology to the Stolen Generation was finally voiced. As this sparks discussion and learning in Simon’s classroom, so too will this sensitive narrative encourage interest and understanding in school children as it outlines what the Stolen Generation is and why saying sorry is just the start of the journey towards ‘peace and coming together’. Filled with tangible emotion and magic, Stories for Simon reveals tragedies and fosters empathy in a brave, provocative coming together of two cultures.

This picture book provides another crucial element in the quest to procure and sustain reconciliation amongst our future generations and thus is an excellent introduction to it.

Random House for Children May 2015

Kookoo Kookaburra Gregg Dreise’s Kookoo Kookaburra and Sally Morgan’s and Ezekiel Kwaymullina’s Magpie Learns a Lesson, are two new picture books, which focus on Dreamtime aphorisms and fables. The message in both is to be kind and respect the feelings of others.

Kookoo Kookaburra, an ace storyteller, falls out of grace with his bushland friends when his good-natured storytelling deteriorates to hurtful personal ridiculing. He must learn to listen and observe more and speak less, whilst distributing kindness more genuinely, because we all know, that is the surest way to have kindness returned.

Magpie learns a lessonMagpie is another wily winged character who discovers that empathy and kindness strengthen friendships far better than teasing and jokes do. Fortunately for him, his best mate, Brown Falcon is wise and patient enough to standby him when disaster strikes.

Both the illustrations of Dreise and those of Tania Erzinger, have a textual fascination that enriches these beautiful Going Bush with Grandpatales. Well suited to lower and mid primary.

Magabala Books May 2015

Omnibus Books February 2015

 Sally Morgan teams once again with her son, Ezekiel Kwaymullina on a series of early chapter books, aimed at developing readers. Each has a cast of indigenous characters who star in family orientated stories (there is usually a grandpa or grandma involved somehow).

 Going Bush with Grandpa was the first. I liked One Rule for Jack. Flying High is number four in the series. Bright, breezy narratives with twerky little endings all One Rule for Jackgenerously illustrated by the iconic Craig Smith will keep smiles on faces for a long, long time.

Omnibus Books Feb 2014 – April 2015

Being at one and living in peace and synchronicity with nature are fundamental in indigenous culture. Animals are intrinsically linked to totems and dreamiDuelgumng stories, which when passed down through generations, ensures continued appreciation and understanding of one’s sense of place. Uncle Joe Kirk and Sandi Harrold, offer retellings of indigenous stories with a desire to educate and preserve.

Duelgum – The story of the mother eel, is a captivating travelog of the journey of the mysterious eel that instils a powerful sense of belonging, underpinning the sanctity of home as a place one can always return.

budinge Budinge and the Min Min Lights, draws kids into Budinge’s world as his imagination threatens to keep him hiding under the bedcovers forever. Full of joy and spirited illustration, this is a lovely example of how we sometimes allow situations to get the better of us.

Scholastic Australia January 2015

The Toast TreeImagine a tree that grows the best tasting toast in the world. The Toast Tree by Corina Martin and Fern Martins is a very special book about a very special tree.

Two young girls anticipate their grandpa’s daily return with rapture because he always brings them the sweetest, creamiest slices of golden-brown toast. Apparently produced on a magic tree that grows deep amongst the sand dunes, only he knows its location and only he can harvest its bounty, otherwise the magic will stop. Like all young people, the desire to discover this magic is intense so, heedless of their uncle’s warning, Mia and Ella search for the toast tree every day, but never find it.

I applaud the subtle duality of this tale; balancing the power of imagination and willingness to believe with the desire to instil magic and parent with love.

Martins’ illustrations are a step sideways from the sometimes-sombre tones of indigenous illustrations too. Colours zing and vibrate with liveliness reflective of the girls’ enthusiasm and convince you that you actually taste the tang of the sea wind as it races across the dunes and tickles your cheeks.

A delicious addition to your picture book collection and gorgeous example of talent coupled with passion.

Magabala Books April 2015

Keep an eye out for more posts on books with indigenous flavour and verve, coming soon. Meantime take a moment to reflect on the milestones and meanings of National Reconciliation Week and what they mean to us all as a Nation.