The Time and Place Book Tag

There are some books in my collection that I’ll always associate with the particular place or time in which I read them. It might be because I read a book on a memorable holiday or read a book at a significant time in my life, but either way, today I’d like to do the Time and Place Book Tag* with you.

The idea is that you take 10 (in this case I’ll only do 5) books from your bookshelf and share the time and place in which you read them. So here goes.

#1 So Many Books, So Little Time: A Year of Passionate Reading by Sara Nelson 
In 2006, my reading was really taking off and I remember reading So Many Books, So Little Time: A Year of Passionate Reading on the tram to and from work. My journey was a relatively short one and I distinctly remember wishing it was a little longer so I could read just one more chapter before I arrived at home or work. Sara Nelson’s enthusiasm for books and reading was contagious and my own reading increased after this.

#2 Dracula by Bram StokerDracula Bram Stoker
In early 2008, I was in the middle of reading Dracula by Bram Stoker when it was time to leave for Fiji to attend a family member’s wedding. I’d planned to finish reading Dracula before we left because I didn’t think it a suitable book for reading in the tropics, but alas, I couldn’t leave it behind. I have a clear memory of reading Dracula in the hotel room with the bright sunshine, palm trees and beach outside while immersed in the cold and darkness of Bram Stoker’s world. The contrast was unforgettable.

#3 The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
In late 2008 I was heading off on my honeymoon and took great joy in deciding what books to take with me on my cruise. (Anyone else do this?) I decided that The Chronicles of Narnia was a nice big fat book, perfect for lounging around with and I wasn’t wrong. I started and finished it on my honeymoon and read more besides. This book is also memorable for me because it was a gift from a dear friend.

#4 Dick Wicks the Magnetic Man by Dick Wicks
Books aren’t always memorable for me just because I read them while on holiday. During a period of poor health in 2011, I turned to the concept of magnets and read Dick Wicks the Magnetic Man – How Magnets Helped Me Beat the Pain by Dick Wicks. He signed a copy for me which I still have and his inspirational and personal story has stayed with me.

#5 The Martian by Andy Weir
In 2014 I went on a two week holiday to New Zealand and took my iPad with me to read a new release called The Martian by Andy Weir. It was a little known title at the time, and I was reading it each night in our hotel room and chuckling on almost every page. My husband asked me what was so funny, and after reading a few snippets, he said “stop, I’ll read it when you’re finished.” A few days later, I handed it over and for the next week, kept pestering him with questions like: “what bit are you up to?” and “what bit are you laughing at?”

Have a look on your own bookshelves. Do some titles stand out to you? Do you remember where you were when you read a particular book or when it was that you read it? I’d love to know, so leave your entries in the comments below.

* The Time and Place Book Tag was created by Jen Campbell, author of Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops.

If You Were Lost on a Desert Island…

OMG Lost fans, guess what?!
The final episode of Lost aired over a week ago on TV, and the world – gasp – is still turning! Hard to believe, I know…

Oh, you guys know I’m only playing with you! Don’t you? I jest, I jest. But truth be told, I don’t get what is so great about Lost. Or rather, I didn’t, until recently.

Being the spoiler-lover that I am, I of course Googled the last episode as it was airing in the US and got the lowdown on what happened during, and how everything ‘came full circle’. Whatever that means. Of course, it didn’t make much difference to me – I had no idea who Jack and Kate and all the rest of them were. But while I was searching for reasons to watch the last six seasons of this TV show I knew very little about but which still managed to create a cult (that is, worldwide popular cult) following, I stumbled across an interesting little tidbit about the show. Apparently, aside from all the Sci Fi time-travel shenanigans and psychological madness and murder, Lost is a show which depends on its literary references to release clues to the audience. Clues to what, I hear you fellow ignoramuses ask. Well, only clues to the whole MYSTERY of Lost, gawd! You may as well have asked, ‘what is the meaning of life?’ (I’m just trying to give you a Lost fan’s perspective here, don’t get all offended).
Turns out literary references turn up in a lot of episodes, and they’re all symbolic of something to do with why these people are stranded on the island in the first place [yes, I realise that this post is strangely serendipitous considering Fiona’s most recent post over at The Book Burglar – coincidence, you ask? More like fate (Fiona, no I don’t think you’ll get stranded on a desert island very similar to the one on Lost…just..keep safe!)].

I am especially partial to the Alice in Wonderland reference – apparently white rabbits are a reoccurring theme in Lost (I wonder what it all means?) and the Chronicles of Narnia reference – the DHARMA initiative station, is named the Lamp Post, after the lamp post which marks the passage between two worlds in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. Could I have been wrong about the show all along? Is it perhaps, not the models-in-bikinis-and-men-with-six-packs serial I first believed it to be ? Is it in fact, a much more respected serial of models-in-bikinis-and-men-with-six-packs atop a mound of LITERARY GENIUS?
Other examples include (but are not limited to): The Brothers’ Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Rainbow Six by Tom Clancy and Ulysses by James Joyce.

If these heavyweight classics are being thrown around like children’s discarded playtoys, it tells me there are some SERIOUS readers at the helm of Lost. In turn, I have to question my pooh-poohing of the series to one of my friends, who absolutely loves Lost but, she says emphatically, not JUST for Sawyer.
So I am done with my Lost snobbery. If it encourages the world to read more, I am ALL for it. Just don’t get me started on Rory from Gilmore Girls…*

*Actually, I want to talk about the Gilmore Girls phenomenon next week. So don’t quote me on that last sentence. It was for effect only, people!