Hippity Hop – Picture Books for Easter

No, you won’t find cute, fluffy chicks or even prettily decorated eggs in these books, but you will find rabbits and some very funny antics! Rather than teaching Easter traditions, we’re going for more of an entertainment-inspired approach to play with your kids over the break. From a pencil playing hide-and-seek to a can-you-guess game of heads and tails, and a hilarious round of Chinese Whispers / Secret Message, these picture books will keep your little ones guessing til the very end.

If you want to see a bunny ‘crack it’ at Easter time then look no further than Rodney Loses It! With Michael Gerard Bauer’s rhyming narrative that enthrals, enlightens and ensnares the emotions, plus Chrissie Krebs’ boisterous cartoons, it’s no wonder this book has made the 2018 CBCA Book of the Year Shortlist for its winning qualities.

A lesson in how NOT to panic, how NOT to dramatically overreact, and certainly how NOT to lose your cool when you’ve lost something precious. This book is a prime example for children around the 4 to 6 year old mark that tantrums, tears and thumping of feet don’t always solve the problem. Rodney and his exacerbated exasperation doesn’t fail to excite and the longer he searches for his beloved pencil the more it makes us laugh. Especially because we know where it is all along!

Colourfully entertaining, full of action, frustration and utter delight, Rodney Loses It! will have its readers begging to relive this bunny’s meltdown time and time again.

Scholastic Australia, September 2017.

Starting off the hunt is the furry-eared, fluffy-tailed rabbit, on a mission to uncover the truth behind its missing other half on the following page. Heads and Tails by John Canty is a beautifully illustrated, interactive game of prior knowledge, prediction and classification that will have its young readers engaged from head to tail!

Each page delivers three colour-coded clues about a certain creature’s characteristics, accompanied by a watercoloured painting of its behind. “I have long furry ears and a small nose. I live in a burrow in the ground. I have a white fluffy tail. I am a…” Then cleverly, upon turning the page, the answer is revealed in bold black text with a more detailed, textured watercolour and black print image showing the front part of its body. Featuring a menagerie of animals, including a tiger, fish, rhinoceros, turtle, crocodile, plus more, the book continues with its repetitive, clues-and-answer format. Not to say there isn’t a little trick or two in there to keep readers on their sharp-witted toes!

Educationally fun, lively to read aloud and play, with a variety of vocabulary and animals to learn, young children will adore Heads and Tails for its spunkiness and rhythm.

Berbay Publishing, May 2017.

Everyone knows that the game Chinese Whispers or Secret Message (Broken Telephone?) usually ends up in a linguistic mess! And this one involves a highly important message about what to bring to a friend’s surprise birthday party. In What the Fluffy Bunny said to the Growly Bear, what DID the fluffy bunny actually say to the growly bear? P. Crumble and Chris Saunders send us along this whacky line of mixed-up messages that keeps us gasping for breath, and squirming with unease at the confusing, amusing calamity that unfolds.

Immediately we are drawn in with Fluffy Bunny’s valiant call for Growly Bear’s attention, and the digitally masterful prominence of the illustrations. But as soon as the characters speak the tone becomes light, and the pictures, airy and sweet, sealing the story’s playful mood and innocence. The bunny’s original instructions were to wear a hat and bring a cake for Zebra’s party. As each animal passes this on, the message becomes more and more woolly with other similar sounding words for ‘hat’ and ‘cake’, such as ‘cat’ and ‘steak’, ‘mat’ and ‘plate’, ‘acrobat’ and ‘snake’, and so on. And when the animals finally come together to deliver their surprise to Zebra, he is not the only one who is surprised…and totally confused!

The illustrations stand out with big, burly characters, just like Growly Bear, accenting a gorgeous backing softness, just like Fluffy Bunny. What the Fluffy Bunny said to the Growly Bear is a gigglicious combination of fun, rhyme, language, short-term memory awareness… and chaos, that will be ‘well-received’ by preschool-aged children these holidays.

Koala Books, Scholastic, March 2018.

Christmas Crackers – Picture Book Reviews

As we mark the first day of December, the Christmas countdown has officially begun. A time for snuggles, a time for giggles, a time for togetherness, a time for giving, a time for remembering and making new memories. Here are a few glorious picture books that have all the joy, laughter and magic of Christmas covered.

imageThere is Something Weird in Santa’s Beard, Chrissie Krebs (author, illus.), Random House Australia, October 2016.

Argh! It’s like The Dreadful Fluff in disguise! Yes, there is a dreadful, terrorising mutant refusing to depart the comfort of Santa’s beard. Created by tired and grotty Santa’s leftover crumbs of bubble gum, candy canes, French fries and mince pies, the hideous, squatting blob threatens to ruin Christmas. It devours toys from the workshop and snaps up the elves’ trap. Santa attempts to remove it but to no avail. At last, it is the skilled, king fu-fighting reindeer that save the day. All is well with Santa until he treats himself after a training session with a sticky ice cream.

Chrissie Krebs has written this story with the great gusto and rollicking rhyme that it deserves. I love the depiction of Mrs Claus, too – homely and caring, but let’s face it, everyone’s patience has its limits! With its slapstick comedy, unfaltering rhyming couplets and vibrantly bright and energetic illustrations, this book makes for a highly engaging and fun read-aloud experience.

There is Something Weird in Santa’s Beard will take your preschoolers on a belly-rolling, chin-tickling journey as Santa overcomes the most terrible experience imaginable. But you can count on poor, messy Santa reliving it over and over again, as he did in our household!

imageI Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas, John Rox (author), Simon Williams (illus.), Scholastic Australia, October 2016.

Here lies the renewal of the classic 1950 song originally written by John Rox, and performed by a young Gayla Peevey in 1953, which resulted in the Oklahoma City zoo acquiring a baby hippo named Matilda.

The story subtly portrays a sweet innocence, yet the narrator is firm with complete conviction on why s/he should have a hippopotamus for Christmas. Written in first person with its irregular upper and lower case handwriting as the main text, this is a fun, lyrical narrative (with bonus CD by Indigenous singer Miranda Tapsell) perfectly capturing the magic of childhood and Christmas for its preschool listeners.

Simon Williams gorgeously ties in this magical essence with his own interpretation of the humour and playfulness through his whimsical illustrations. Pairing a ginger kitten as narrator with its ‘Hippo Hero’ is an inspiring move portraying a wonderful unlikely friendship. The kitten makes promises to feed and care for it, and is excited by the hope of being surprised by its presence on Christmas morning. No crocodile or rhino would do, “I only like hippopotamuses. And hippopotamuses like me too!”

Adorably energetic, bouncy and joyful, children from age three will be adamant that they want I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas for Christmas.

imageThe Night Before Christmas, Clement Clarke Moore (text), Helene Magisson (illus.), New Frontier Publishing, November 2016.

With illustrations that are soft with warmth, deep with texture and rich with love, this newest edition of The Night Before Christmas is truly one to treasure.

With the timeless poem by Clement Clarke Moore, talented illustrator Helene Magisson works her magic to create a stunning gift for any family celebrating Christmas. As Santa and his eight reindeer journey through the snow-speckled sky to below the snow-crested rooftop, we are soothed by the pale watercolour tones that beautifully contrast the outdoor shades of blues with the indoor hues of reds. I also love the little whimsical subtleties like Santa’s cheeky expressions, the playful cat and the koala toy for our Australian readers.

With a special story and exquisite illustrations that represent togetherness, comfort and the undeniable joy that is Christmas, The Night Before Christmas is a beautiful keepsake for children between four and six years old.

You can find more fantastic gifts in the Kids Reading Guide 2016.

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Quirks, Quandaries and Quips – Picture Book Reviews  

I love coming across books that allow the freedom to ‘think outside the square‘, so to speak. Books that play ‘chasey‘ with your imagination and let you run wild. And books that at the end of a chaotic day leave you with a warm and fuzzy feeling in your heart. The following three picture books do all those things in their own special kind of way.

imageStanley, written and illlustrated by Colin Thompson, takes quirky to a whole new level. Thompson, a legend in the children’s book world, superbly paints a solid picture of his unique characters, both conceptually and visually. Focusing on the themes of non-judgement and individuality, his descriptive language, gangly humans and mixed media images align perfectly.

Stanley may look as if he was “built out of bricks that had been leant against and rained on and loved…, as strong as a mountain” but in truth he was “as soft as a pillow.” Adorably depicted across the page is Stanley in his muddy glory, sitting wide-eyed and innocent under the spotlight. As you will see, the thing that makes Stanley happy and his tail quiver most is his red ball (and his human, Gerald). Life with a small family (Stanley, Gerald and his mum) has its perks and responsibilities, but at times he feels lonely. One day, Stanley is disappointed after an unfortunate occurrence at the park. Then, without realising how it happened (since dogs usually don’t understand the intricacies of people’s bonding process), his house is filled with a new family. Stanley may not realise the connection between his park experience and his current living situation, but he finds himself enjoying the baking smells, extra company… and a brand new red ball. Although, he probably could have done without the tablecloth bridesmaid’s dress!

Stanley is a witty and gentle book about the complexities of human personalities and relationships and the simplicities of a dog’s life. There is also a subtle yet valuable message about taking risks with understanding people (and dogs) and looking beyond the exterior. Recommended for primary school children.

ABC Books, 2016.

imageChasing her previous excitable tale, Clementine’s Walk, Annie White‘s latest delight follows suit in the same charismatic demeanour; it’s Clementine’s Bath.

Guaranteed to whip preschoolers along on this wild romp, Clementine and her smells sure do arouse. Pongs from rubbish piles are not quite considered the bed of roses that this carefree pooch relishes, and the family won’t have a whiff of it. So now she finds herself in a bit of a quandary. Bounding off in rhyming couplets, Clementine makes her dash away from the dreaded B-A-T-H and all through the house. Hiding in an assortment of obscure places, like between pot plants, into the shed and inside the toybox, Clementine’s efforts fall flat and she, to her dismay, surrenders with a SPLASH! But perhaps there are perks to being clean and pleasant-smelling, after all.

Delightfully energetic and fast paced in all the right places, Clementine’s Bath exudes this chaotic liveliness that most dog owners know all too well. With softness, warmth and colour, this book will groom young readers into the excitement of caring for a pet.

New Frontier Publishing, 2015.

imagePreschoolers will take absolute pleasure at the quips these characters have prepared for their readers. This is a Circle by Chrissie Krebs is no more than an all-rounded, wise-cracking, rhyming pursuit in top form. With bold, vibrant colours and animated personalities much in likeness of Ben Wood’s illustrations, here is a page-turning, eye-catching and whimsical tale with an abundance of energy.

It all looks innocent enough when we are introduced to the seemingly-friendly characters and a random selection of labelled objects. But things quickly turn sour when animal turns against animal and objects are used for pure selfish gain. First the tap-dancing goat climbs the enormous box. Then the song-singing cat is cat-apulted up there due to his own reckless driving habits. A violent pant-wearing fox angers the wild-looking bear who chases him around and up to the top of the box (with the help of a pile of the randomly-selected shapes, objects and vehicles). And so now that they have successfully squabbled their way to the top, what will be their next quandary?

A highly entertaining collection of giggles and teachable moments with its clever integration of concepts and rhyming words. The text highlights those key words with bold and enlarged print, enabling young readers to identify the sounds and main elements in the story. Oh, not to mention the slick, tactile cut out circle on the front cover is a great way to hook readers in! Funny, innovative and engaging, This is a Circle will have children from age three running in circles to have this book read to them again and again.

Penguin Random House Australia, 2016.

For more concept-related books see Dimity‘s list here.

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