Review: Eliza And Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia

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Eliza And Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia is the ultimate book for those of us who hiss at sunlight and live on the internet. It’s brimming with internet, geek, and nerdom appreciation! And on top of that, the writing is absolutely amazing and it features protagonists’ struggling with anxiety and depression and their entirely relatable journeys. This book just felt so applicable to this day! I can do naught but appreciate it’s perfection.

The story follows Eliza who is the anonymous creator of an internet-famous webcomic series called Monstrous Sea. Online she is a mysterious and powerful creator and is loved and adored by so many. She’s made quite the profit off her business and fans adore every chapter update. Her closest friends are online and she can talk to them about anything. But in the physical life? Eliza hates leaving her room. She barely talks and has severe anxiety and depression and every day is just about getting through school so she can finish and go to college to study art. Until she meets a fanfic writer at her very school: Wallace. The two form a deep friendship based on their loves of the Monstrous Sea fandom and their connection over anxiety (Wallace has selective mutism). But Wallace doesn’t know who Eliza truly is. And she’s not sure if telling him will ruin everything.

I was already a big fan of the author’s debut, Made You Up, so I went into this story know it’d be amazing. I maybe liked the debut better, but this one just hit home with the levels of sheer geekdom over the comicseries. I think anyone who’s anxious, introverted, or loves to get lost in literature — will definitely relate to Eliza and feel understood.

 

“Eliza, your worth as a person is not dependant on the art you create or what other people think of it.”

 

I also loved the emphasis on internet friendships! Most of Eliza’s life is online and her parents are of the opinion that online-friends-aren’t-real-friends. Which is obviously ridiculous and stresses Eliza out a lot. She loves the freedom of the internet, the chance to think before she has to talk. I also couldn’t get over how awesome Max and Emmy, Eliza’s chat buddies, were. We only “met” them through internet dialogue, but they were so complex, interesting, and relatable! I also loved that there was quite an age gap between the three friends (Eliza was 17, Emmy 14, and Max in his early twenties). It just goes to show and prove that internet friendship can and will transcend barriers. The whole thing was sweet and lovely! The book totally did highlight how the internet can suck, but mostly it was positive which was such a refreshing change.

And of course I must mention how wonderful the featuring characters of Eliza and Wallace were! It was amazing to read how they both struggled with anxiety, but it displayed in different forms (with Eliza retreating from life, and Wallace not speaking in public). It goes to show what a spectrum mental health issues are. I also loved Eliza’s family, who were sweet and kind…if totally clueless about her love and dedication to her webcomic. They really did try to connect with her, even though they often made things worse. And Wallace was complex and interesting. Their relationship starts as tentative friends and then progresses so sweetly. I loved it!

Also anytime someone says “exercise” Eliza runs away. This is relatable and perfect.

It also was great that the book featured people who weren’t good at talking, but still communicated through art, writing, and notes. There’s still plenty of dialogue in the book, but the balance was perfect.

And the book is also illustrated! Many sections and pages have snippets of Eliza’s comic. And it includes emails and web-chats too, to make a very entirely pleasing and uniquely formatted novel.

 

“Do you ever have an idea for a story, a character, or even a line of dialogue or something, and suddenly it seems like the whole world is brighter? Like everything opens up, and everything makes sense?”

Eliza And Her Monsters is definitely the kind of book you need in your life! The sheer amount of GEEK AND INTERNET LOVE makes it so worth it. I love how I felt understood by it and I love how it really explained and delved into the reasons why fandoms and art and writing are so important to some people!

Chook Doolan is Back

Award-winning author James Roy and talented illustrator Lucinda Gifford are back with another four sensational books in the popular series for junior readers, Chook Doolan. It is a witty and warm-hearted series suited to sensitive young souls navigating their way through challenging feelings of uncertainty and apprehension.

I reviewed two previous titles here (#3 and #4), outlining these creators’ ability to capture the heart, emotion and relatability sublimely to fit their emergent reader audience. Supportive language structures, short chapters and engaging illustrations allow children from age five to achieve success whilst absorbing every moral and humorous fibre of life within the pages.

Early primary-aged readers will relish the joy and culture shining from the pages in Let’s Do Diwali (#5). Venturing into unknown territory with a tradition he doesn’t know and a crowded event is a daunting prospect for timid Chook – aptly nicknamed for his tendency to scare easily.
When paired with the quietly-spoken Praj on a school task, Chook is presented with the opportunity to learn about Diwali. He is, however, apprehensive about attending the Hindu festival of lights, and subsequently performing well on the class talk. But by embracing the spirit of the culture by wearing a kurta, trying the Indian cuisine and engaging the happy crowd, Chook’s feelings of fear dissolve into excitement. He even feels confident at school to deliver his speech about the ‘awesome’ time he had at the Diwali festival.
This is a valuable story about understanding and welcoming other traditions, and overcoming feelings of anxiety with clearly accessible and supportive practices. Let’s Do Diwali is a jubilant celebration to revisit frequently!

On the Road (#6) is about a family trip to Aunty Liz’s home in Mount Frederick. Chook is unsure about spending time with his younger twin girl cousins. He worries about other things, too, like leaving his pets behind, and having to spend three hours in the car with his taunting older brother, Ricky. Luckily, Chook finds a mutual connection with one of the girls, Evie, through his favourite activity of chess.
This book provides a gentle encouragement that shows serendipitous moments can arise in a safe and supportive environment. A little bit of courage to interact with new or unfamiliar people can lead to some wonderful relationships.

In Un-Happy Camper (#7), Simon Henry Doolan; or Chook, expresses a range of emotions from anxiety to frustration to acceptance and relief. Finding out that his class will be attending a school camp, Chook is no more than unenthusiastic. Snakes and getting homesick are not his cup of tea. All he needs is a few gentle pushes from his mum to convince him that it will be alright. This sensitive, persuasive approach and positive attitude helps Chook through his anguish, and he thoroughly enjoys the school camp…even though they didn’t really go anywhere!
The focus on Chook’s feelings throughout his psychological journey is written effectively to help readers understand their own, sometimes mixed, emotions, and finding ways to ease those discomforts. At the same time the story is injected with humour and intuitively sharp black and white illustrations.

In Up and Away (#8), Chook has been given a school assignment to explore a job he might like to pursue as an adult. Naturally, he is drawn to the job of his father – a pilot. But, there are things about being a pilot that are scary, such as visiting new places and meeting new people. In a cleverly fun way, Chook’s dad teaches him a little about the structure and physics of a plane, which is somewhat reassuring. Whilst waiting for his dad in the Club Lounge, Chook is granted an opportunity to quash his own fears, and impart his knowledge, to help another in need.
This book beautifully showcases the fact that ‘ knowledge is power’, and stepping out of your comfort zone leads to a sense of empowerment and personal growth. Once again, relevant, entertaining and encouraging, young readers will delight in this gratifying story of developing independence.

The Chook Doolan series for junior readers, and in particular young boys developing their literacy skills, is absolutely addictive. These stories of overcoming internal struggles and developing self-confidence are highly relatable, uncomplicated and transparent, as well as pleasantly engaging. Five to eight year olds will definitely be clucking for more!

Author James Roy

Illustrator Lucinda Gifford

Walker Books Australia, June 2017.

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Empowering Inspiration – Picture Book Reviews

The following picture books possess special qualities in their ability to address difficult topics, but in most sensitive and inspiring ways. From the team at publishing company, Empowering Resources, here are three valuable resources that can literally change the lives of many dealing with tough life circumstances.

imageThe courageous and talented Naomi Hunter, founder of Empowering Resources has brilliantly delivered these touching tales to the world. Her first authored book, A Secret Safe to Tell, explores the delicate issue of childhood sexual abuse, based on a troubling time from her past. With beautifully gentle illustrations by Karen Erasmus, this book is one of comfort and encouragement in feeling safe enough to trust in seeking help.

Children who are victims of abuse understandably are confused when fun, warm love and a special relationship with someone they know turns into a period of awkwardness, hurts and threats. Even though this is what they are told to believe, abuse is never their fault. When the little girl in the story eventually faces her fears and exposes her secret to the flowers and birds, she is serendipitously blessed with a new, colourful heart and the power to be free…

Unsurprisingly shortlisted in the 2015 Australian Book Industry Awards, A Secret Safe to Tell has brought about a revolution of support for this initiative and has helped many around the world share their stories and lift their heavy burdens in order to heal. It has also already been, and will continue to be a fabulous, ’empowering resource’ for early years educators and parents to teach their children about body safety, appropriate interactions with older people in their lives, and that it is ok to tell.

Read more in my interview with Naomi Hunter.

imageNaomi‘s most recently published book, Even Mummy Cries, explores the emotional rollercoaster that often accompanies families on their journey that is life. Whatever the type of struggles being faced, it is perfectly normal, and healthy even, to have an outlet for the internal battles we are dealing with. For this heart-rending and reassuring story, the soft watercolour and pencil illustrations by Karen Erasmus are suitably gentle, visually captivating and highly impactful.

The children in the story just adore their fun mummy, who loves them back “more than a GAZILLION BILLION TRILLION plus INFINITY.” But when she reverts to a sad and lonely place, and EXPLODES with tears in the middle of the night, the kids feel a sense of hopelessness and a deep sting in their hearts. Until the tears stop…

imageAt the very heart of this book is the security for its readers; Mums, you are not alone. Kids, well, you just do what you do and your mummies love and treasure you no matter what! With beautiful sentiments, Even Mummy Cries is another important book for primary school aged children to understand some of life’s complexities without feeling guilt, and the power for parents to be able to share their pressures in sensitive ways without feeling shame.

Read more about Naomi Hunter’s inspiration for this story here.

imageYou’re Different, Jemima! explores self-expression, individuality and self-assurance. Written with gusto, just like the nature of our main character, Jedidah Morley sends a positive and nurturing message that standing ‘loud and proud’, and just being yourself is more than ok. I particularly like the colour variations that Karen Erasmus uses to highlight the scenes of imagination and personality as opposed to the overall sense of uniformity.

Jemima’s teacher, Mrs Smith and the other students degrade her for ‘colourful’ and unique ways of expressing herself. It is her eccentric-looking duck picture that has everyone, including Jemima, questioning her sense of belonging. But when Mrs Chuckles takes over teaching the next day, Jemimah’s self doubt is put to rest and her ‘differences’ are celebrated.

You’re Different, Jemima! is a refreshing story for preschoolers that allows and encourages individual personalities to shine as bold and bright as they can be.

The Empowering Resources website with all their current and upcoming books can be found here.

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Children with Anxiety – Picture Book Reviews

Often it is our differences, fears and anxieties that contribute to our feelings (or lack thereof) of self-worth. It is common within our society to feel out of place or lack self-confidence. But you know what? That’s OK! Maybe it just takes a little time to warm up, to find your feet and be ready to tackle the world. Understanding and accepting oneself can often be a process that takes maturing, and a gentle and sympathetic support system can be a vital part of that growth. The following two books deal with these tender matters in beautifully delicate and encouraging ways.

imageThe Underwater Fancy-Dress Parade, Davina Bell (author), Allison Colpoys (illus.), Scribe Publications, 2015.

A sensitive young boy named Alfie feels the weight of the world on his shoulders as he struggles with social anxiety. Naturally, he’d rather hide than face performing as Captain Starfish in the upcoming fancy-dress parade. Those all-too-familiar feelings of nervousness that he has experienced before return. Admitting his fear of failure to the cowboys on his wallpaper is scary enough, but how will his Mum react when he tells her he can’t go?

Well, Mum (and Dad) are gratefully understanding. In fact, Mum takes Alfie to the aquarium instead. The underwater world is beautiful and wondrous, but upon spotting a starfish, just like his costume, he feels that heaviness weighing upon him once more. Fortuously it is a little shy clownfish that he connects with who shows him that it’s alright to wait in the wings (or coral, so to speak) until the time to emerge from the depths feels right.

imageDavina Bell’s genuinely heartfelt and beautifully written text so effectively relates Alfie’s fears and nightmares in an empathetic, delicate manner. Equally, Colpoys‘s exquisite illustrations with their soothing blues and greys and pops of neon orange, and the fantastic use of space and perspective add that perfect depth of soul and vulnerability.

The Underwater Fancy-Dress Parade’ speaks into the lives of many children facing anxiety. A poignant and enchanting tale set to add a little sparkle and illumination to the more sensitive souls of this often daunting world.

imageBeing Agatha, Anna Pignataro (author, illus.), The Five Mile Press, 2015.

Here we have another reserved child fearing the judgement of others. But just like it did for the boy in Davina Bell’s book, it takes time and encouragement for this character to truly realise what makes her an individual and thus overcome her internal struggles.

We are immediately drawn in with a pertinent discussion topic. First we see that Agatha’s parents are of an inter-racial (or inter-specie) communion, and that Agatha is centred at this somewhat of a divide at family get-togethers. Then there’s the fact that her likes and abilities seem less impressive than others’ – another reason to feel a sense of lack of worth. So Agatha decides that hiding from her classmates is the solution, until she realises that she’s more important than she thinks. With a little reinforcement from her teacher, Agatha’s friends are able to rattle off a number of traits that make her special. But they all agree, “no one else is a better Agatha than you!”

imageWhilst Anna Pignataro‘s simple narrative relays Agatha’s worries about her lack of belonging, it is her pictures that form the basis for its interpretation. Anna’s language is sensitive and gentle, and her illustrations support these qualities unequivocally. The grey tones of the charcoal render the story’s restrain and softness yet carry a sense of similarity amongst the characters. And it is the pops of watercolours and collage elements that give life, spirit and individuality to each of them, too. A wonderfully eclectic mix that this book highlights of difference as well as belonging.

‘Being Agatha’ is a modest, sweet and intriguing story lightly addressing feelings of anxiety with a reassuring touch that a range of young children (and species) between 2 and 6 will be able to relate to.

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Review: The Unlikely Hero of Room 13B by Teresa Toten

9781406362992The Unlikely Hero of Room 13B is basically described in one word: INCREDIBLE.

Just seriously, wow. This book takes a really honest and relatable look at mental illness (specifically OCD). I got totally sucked in and emotionally tangled within mere pages. It’s only 270-pages and WOAH does it pack a punch.

Basically it’s about Adam who meets Robyn at an anxiety support group and — boom — insta connection. He is dazzled by her and, sure, she’s a year older, but he can work with that. (He is 14. He is a little bit of a silly goose, but endearing.) It deals with the complications of divorced parents, mental illness, family, and first loves and, of course, growing up.

It’s written in 3rd point-of-vew, which sometimes can make a reader feel disjoined and detached? BUT NOPE. I felt entirely in Adam’s thought process. He had a bit of a “bounce” in his step, which was so refreshing to read! Particularly when you know he’s suffering from crippling anxiety. And the book really address it, too! Anxiety affects 1 in 4 people in Australia. Adam is actually trying to get better, too, so the book is uplifting in that he’s going to a support group and working towards managing. It ain’t simple though, folks. COMPLICATIONS ABOUND.

There is also an adorable relationship between Adam and his little 5-year-old half-brother, “Sweetie” (Wendell) who also shows signs of severe-anxiety/OCD. And the kid is only five. Adam is always THERE for his brother.

So let’s talk about Robyn: the love interest! Of course there’s romance, because this is YA, and there’s a good smattering of “insta-love” from page 1. Adam sees Robyn. Adam falls in love with Robyn. I was thinking, “Dude, chiiiill.” But he IS only 14 and he’s so endearing as he goes about trying to be her friend.

Also there’s a superhero vibe. YES PLEASE AND THANK YOU! I am a huge superhero fan, so I loved the little twist of all the kids in the support group taking on “superhero names”. Obviously Adam chose “Batman” to compliment Robyn’s “Robin”. (SO ADORABLE.)

 

OTHER THINGS TO LOVE:

  • That the characters were getting HELP. Often I feel like YA books delve into mental illness, but it’s the path down. What about how-to-start-managing-your-illness?! That’s good info to read about too!! So therapy is painted in a positive light.
  • Did I mention comics?! I love this.
  • The huge focus on friendship. It was PERFECT. Adam was friends to everyone in the support group, despite being worried and anxious and having zero self-worth. So much win in friendship stories!
  • Also the huge emphasis on family. This really is all about family. OH MY FAVOURITE. It was perfectly written and aahhhhh I had all the feels of ever.

 

 

Basically The Unlikely Hero of Room 13B is one you need in your life. ASAP. If you want to know what it’s like to live with anxiety (OCD in particular, but anxiety is the root of OCD) then read this book because it’s an A+ representation.

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‘In a World of Imagination’ – Interview with Anna Walker

imageAnna Walker; master creator of picture books encompassing emotion, wisdom, sensitivity, adventure, charm and humour. And equally as gentle, creative, genuine and profound as her delightful stories and pictures is the author / illustrator herself, with which I had the utmost pleasure in meeting recently at her Mr Huff Exhibition. I am honoured that the amazingly talented Anna Walker has agreed to shed some light on her enchanting book-creating world and her newest masterpiece, Mr Huff (review here).  

imageYour trademark style of illustrating is always infallibly charming with its whimsical and multi-textured features. How did you develop this style and how did you come to illustrate books for children?

Ever since I was child I had wanted to illustrate children’s books. I developed my work with wanting to create an illustration that was hand crafted – a small piece of art. Perhaps this has contributed to my work looking textured as I use cut paper, watercolours, etching and woodblock. I look for different mediums to bring to life the picture I have in mind. Sometimes it reminds me of playing with my doll’s house as a child, making tiny cut flowers, blankets, and paintings to hang on the wall of the miniature rooms! The whimsy I don’t seem to be able to help, no matter what I try it is part of who I am, it seems my love of fairy tales and enchanted worlds pervades my world.  

imageYour long-standing partnership with the masterful author, Jane Godwin, has been hugely successful with titles including ‘Today We Have No Plans’, ‘Little Cat and the Big Red Bus’, ‘Starting School’, and ‘All Through the Year’. How did the pairing come about, and what aspects of working with her do you enjoy most?

In 2007, Penguin said they were going to send me a manuscript of a story to see if I was interested in illustrating it. I remember the yellow A4 envelope arriving in the mail and sitting on the corner of the couch to open the package. In the afternoon sun I read Little Cat and the Big Red Bus, written by Jane Godwin. By the time I finished I had tears in my eyes, it was so beautiful. I could hardly believe I had been asked to illustrate a true picture book that was so special.  This was the beginning a wonderful partnership. I love collaborating with Janie, she is a wonderful writer and an inspiring person.    

Many of your books were penned and illustrated independently. Do you find working independently or in collaboration more challenging, and why?

I enjoy collaborating as much as working independently. In some ways every book is a collaboration because you are chatting about the ideas and what the story is communicating early on with the editor, your family, friends and the designer.    

Your writing style is equally as gentle, thoughtful and enchanting as your pictures. How do you get this harmony so aligned? Do you prefer one aspect of the book creation over the other?

Thank you for your kind words! I prefer the drawing and painting over the writing. At times I find the writing very difficult but I persist as I have a vision of a story to tell. My stories usually are sparked by images and I bring the words in later to partner them.  

imageCongratulations on the launch of your latest picture book release, ‘Mr Huff’! Your recent exhibition beautifully showcased your work, including the book’s storyboard process, from inception to completion, original artworks, as well as your adorable models used in your stop-motion trailer. Can you tell us a bit about the response you’ve received so far. Any stand out moments? What was your most rewarding part of the process?

I couldn’t be happier with the way the Mr Huff exhibition went. In the lead up to the exhibition I wondered why I was having it. I felt like cancelling the whole thing. But on the opening night everyone was so lovely and said such kind things about the story.  During the exhibition it was particularly rewarding for me to see tiny children fascinated with the puppet I made of Mr Huff for the stop motion. A highlight for me was an email from a mum with two boys one of whom experienced Anxiety. The mum said the book was now part of their lives and that some days they described as ‘Huff Days’. When I read  these words they made every bit of the work that went into the story worth it.  

‘Mr Huff’ is a stunningly poignant yet uplifting and sweet story of a young boy who overcomes this growing sense of melancholy around him. Where did the inspiration for this story come from, and how did it develop?

The inspiration came from scribbling in my visual diary when I was feeling worried about things. There was no real reason for this anxiety it’s just something that visits me sometimes. I was drawing how that feels when it occurred to me perhaps I could translate that idea into a picture book. And so Mr Huff was born.  

The message of embracing challenges and being positive is one that stands out in ‘Mr Huff’. What would you like readers to gain from this book? Do you have a motto or life philosophy?

I find it fascinating how different people respond to the book. When a book ventures out into the world you hope that some families will relate to the story but I am never really sure whether that will happen. I have been overwhelmed with the lovely responses to Mr Huff.  

What do you love most about writing and illustrating for children?

I think the thing I love most is traipsing in the world of the imagination. It is very exciting to take a character that you can see in your mind and create a reality for them, to bring them to life so to speak.  To tell a story in 32 pages means your thoughts and ideas need to be distilled so that the result of the few words partnered with pictures speak volumes. I believe in the picture book being a true art form and think children deserve the time and consideration put into the books they are reading.  

Which authors and/or artists have been your greatest influences in becoming the successful writer and illustrator you are now?

Growing up, I was surrounded by wonderful authors such as A.A.Milne, Beatrix Potter and William Steig. I had open access to books with my mum being a librarian. A stand out though was Maurice Sendak who had a huge impact on me. When I was in Grade 3, I was mesmerised by Where the Wild Things Are and thrilled that our class made cardboard monsters of the Wild Things! I remember reading Aranea by Jenny Wagner and being struck by how a picture book could be about something so simple, so quiet and gentle.
The Australian authors and illustrators also played a big role in forming the illustrator I am today. Ron Brooks, Alison Lester, Ann James and Bob Graham are such pivotal figures in Australian literature and each inspiring in how they continue to create amazing children’s books.  

You’ve been winning numerous literary awards around Australia since 2009. What do these honours mean to you? Are there any that stand out as most significant to you?

The Crichton award in 2009 was one of the most special as when I was in the audience I sat in between Bob Graham and Pamela Allen! Bob chatted to me, and it is a memory I will treasure. I must admit I also loved Peggy being shortlisted in 2013 as my children were very impressed with the gold sticker!  

What projects are you currently working on? What can all of your fans look forward to seeing from you in the near future?

I am working on two special stories. One of them is about a little girl and it is set in Paris. I can’t wait to begin the paintings!  

What advice would you give to aspiring writers and illustrators wanting to publish their own picture books?
Be brave. Draw, write and explore ideas. Explore history, colour, mediums, reference, typography, design, experiences and anything else you are passionate about. Make books. Read them out loud. Find your voice.

Thank you so very much for answering my questions, Anna! It’s been a real pleasure!

Visit Anna Walker’s website and facebook pages.

imageHer new book with Jane Godwin, What Do You Wish For? will be out this September.

Review – Mr Huff by Anna Walker

Mr Huff, Anna Walker (author, illus.), Penguin Viking, July 2015.

9780670078042Delicately explored in her books are often the themes of maintaining a sense of being, having belief in yourself and looking on the brighter side of life. With treasures including the ‘I Love’ series, Peggy, I Don’t Believe in Dragons, Hurry Up Alfie, and Alfie’s Lost Sharkie, Anna Walker has once again brilliantly captured a little ray of sunshine in the delightful, Mr Huff.  

As soon as Bill wakes up he is burdened with a gloomy scribble cloud above his head. His morning goes from bad to worse, with dog-chewed socks, soggy cereal and an uncooperative backpack. As Bill’s bad mood heightens, so does this growing sense of apprehension that overshadows his every move. It’s Mr Huff. Bill grumbles about Mr Huff’s presence at bathtime, bedtime, toilet breaks and has moments of attempted bravery to banish him. Whilst funny on the surface, we feel his pain. His internal struggle finally explodes like a raging storm. And then all is still. Bill eventually finds his calm, befriending the vast grey mass, and the sun is able to shine through the clouds. Mr Huff, the symbolic ‘worry’, has diminished, and we’re left with an ending that is bittersweet.

large_mr_huff_6Anna Walker has so masterfully been able to convey Bill’s emotional journey, from his feelings of anxiety and misplacement through his progression to a more positive outlook, in her sensitive, thought-provoking text. But not without injecting that gorgeous sense of humour that makes her books so engaging and loveable. As for the illustrations, naturally they are whimsical, enchanting and exude personality. If you were able to cast your very own eyes on the visual feast displayed at her recent Mr Huff Exhibition in Melbourne, like I did, you would appreciate the absolute skill of Anna’s individually painted, cut and pasted pieces, multiple textures and media (including paper, fabric, watercolours, etching and woodblock prints). Just incredible!

Mr Huff is a gentle, touching and multi-layered story of embracing one’s feelings and finding beauty in the world. It’s a charming and meaningful book for both young children and adults who will ensure that Mr Huff visits them again and again.  

Read the exclusive interview with Anna Walker, here!

View Anna Walker’s ‘Mr Huff’ Behind the Studio Door and Book Trailer here.
See my experience at the Mr Huff Exhibition here.