Review – Dandelions

Dandelions FCOne day, a little girl’s father does an inconceivably bad thing. Granted he is not even aware of the crime he has just committed, which for the girl makes it all the more unconscionable. She’s too late to thwart his mindless destruction and cannot save the dandelions he has just mown in their backyard. Thus begins the picture book, Dandelions by first time team, Katrina McKelvey and Kirrili Lonergan. Now this raises the all-important question; just what is so important about a dandelion? Are they simply not just bothersome weeds, as her father is quick to point out?

The girl attempts to elucidate the many and varied reasons she holds the dandelions so dear. They are in short, magical. So magical in fact, the girl knows that if she waits long enough, they will in time, reappear. Full of remorse, Dad observes his daughter’s sad and lonely vigil and sets out to cheer her up. Fortunately, for them both, a small clump of dandelions survives and together, father and daughter embark on a whimsical journey fuelled purely on joy and the wonderment of nature. As the dandelion seed-heads puff away, so too, do the imaginations of the girl and her father, wild and unfettered like the very wind they float on.

The next half a dozen or so pages spin and swirl readers on a truly breathtaking odyssey up and over, through and around the neighbourhood. In a flight of true unbridled joy, the words twist and twirl and spiral and whirl across the pages too, as though teased by a capricious wind, past flowers bigger, and brighter than the humble dandelion but never quite as free.

The subtle biology lesson from Dad serves to perpetuate the magic as assuredly as the breezy distribution of these puffballs ensures future dandelions and at last, our little girl finds comfort in her garden once again.

image McKelvey bravely uses verbal exchange to establish the bond between father and daughter but it’s the undulating sounds and colours of the prose used for the dandelions’ passage through the neighbourhood that I find most beguiling. Lonergan’s line and water colour illustrations enhance the dreamlike quality of this story and explore some interesting perspectives from both a small person’s and a tumbling dandelion parachute’s point of view. Together they paint a satisfying picture of fatherly love and the tenacity of nature, which parallels the importance of never giving up.

Dandelions spread # 2A dandelion puffball is in itself a beautiful thing. Blow on it and that beauty instantly multiples. McKelvey and Lonergan have taken this simple concept and exponentially increased its magic. Understated and as delicate as a dandelion in full flight, Dandelions is sure to fill the soft pastel and fairy predilections of many a young miss and make you want to seek out a puffball to set in a flight of fantasy of your own.

Want to learn more about this fascinating flower and the author behind Dandelions? Then drift over to Romi’s interview with Katrina McKelvey.

EK Books October 2015

 
 

 

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Dimity Powell

Dimity Powell likes to fill every spare moment with words. She writes and reviews stories exclusively for kids and is the Managing Editor for Kids’ Book Review. Her word webs appear in anthologies, school magazines, junior novels, as creative digital content, and picture books. Her junior novel, PS Who Stole Santa’s Mail? debuted in 2012. The Fix-It Man is her first published picture book with EK Books in 2017. Dimity is a useless tweeter, sensational pasta maker and semi-professional chook wrangler. She believes picture books are food for the soul and should be consumed at least 10 times a week.

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