Join the Boomerang Books ‘Baldies’ – World’s Greatest Shave Team

Become a ‘baldy’ and join us for the Leukaemia Foundation’s World’s Greatest Shave from 11-13 March 2010.

The funds we raise will help the Leukaemia Foundation to provide practical care and support to patients and families living with leukaemias, lymphomas, myeloma and related blood disorders.

Join the Boomerang Books ‘Baldies’ team now and start raising money…

Don’t wanna get your head shaved or dyed?  Then you can still donate money to the Boomerang Books ‘Baldies’ here…

BREAKING: Anthony Horowitz Tour Cancelled

Children’s author Anthony Horowitz has cancelled his upcoming tour of Australia and New Zealand.
 
“I am very sorry that I am unable to come to Australia/New Zealand this year as I had originally planned. I have just had two television related projects land on my desk which will monopolise my time. Unfortunately I simply cannot meet all my writing deadlines whilst undertaking an international tour,” Anthony said.
 
“Once again, I apologise for not being able to make it for now but I want to pass on my heartfelt thanks for your ongoing support and enthusiasm for my books which means so much to me.”
 
2010 marks the tenth anniversary of Anthony’s wildly successful Alex Rider series.

Boomerang congratulates: AUREALIS AWARD WINNERS 2009! [Part Two]

Here are the adult winners of the 2009 Aurealis Awards – some of Australia’s finest sci-fi/fantasy releases of 2009 have made the list!

Best Science Fiction Novel
Wonders of a Godless World by Andrew McGahan

On an unnamed island, in a Gothic hospital sitting in the shadow of a volcano, a wordless orphan girl works on the wards housing the insane and the incapable. When a silent, unmoving and unnerving new patient – a foreigner – arrives at the hospital, strange phenomena occur, bizarre murders take place, and the lives of the patients and the island’s inhabitants are thrown into turmoil. What happens between them is an extraordinary exploration of consciousness, reality and madness. Wonders of a Godless World, the new novel from Miles Franklin-winner Andrew McGahan, is a huge and dramatic beast of a book. It is a thought-provoking investigation into character and consciousness, a powerful cautionary tale, and a head-stretching fable about the earth, nature and the power of the mind.

Best Fantasy Novel
The Magician’s Apprentice by Trudi Canavan

Set hundreds of years before the events of The Magicians’ Guild, The Magician’s Apprentice is the new novel set in the world of Trudi Canavan’s Black Magician Trilogy. In the remote village of Mandryn, Tessia serves as assistant to her father, the village Healer. Her mother would rather she found a husband. But her life is about to take a very unexpected turn. When the advances of a visiting Sachakan mage get violent, Tessia unconsciously taps unknown reserves of magic to defend herself. Lord Dakon, the local magician, takes Tessia under his wing as an apprentice. The long hours of study and self-discipline also offer more opportunities than she had ever hoped for, and an exciting new world opens up to her. There are fine clothes and servants – and, to Tessia’s delight – regular trips to the great city of Imardin. But along with the excitement and privilege, Tessia is about to discover that her magical gifts bring with them a great deal of responsibility. For great danger looms on the horizon for Tessia and her world.

Best Horror Novel
Red Queen by Honey Brown

Shannon and Rohan Scott have retreated to their family’s cabin in the Australian bush to escape a virus-ravaged world. After months of isolation, Shannon imagines there’s nothing he doesn’t know about his older brother, or himself – until a stranger slips under their late-night watch and past their loaded guns. Reluctantly, the brothers take the young woman into their fold, and the dynamic within the cabin shifts. Possessiveness takes hold, loyalties are split, and trust is shattered. Before long, all three find themselves locked into a very different battle for survival.

Best Collection
Oceanic by Greg Egan

Synopsis of ‘Oceanic’ short story: The people of Covenant believe they are the descendants of immaterial “Angels” who were brought to the planet by the daughter of God to “repent their theft of immortality” and live and die as flesh once more.
Martin is a Freelander, raised on the ocean, and a personal experience as a child convinces him of the truth of this account. But when he becomes a biologist and begins to study the native life of Covenant, his work leads to revelations about the true history of the planet, and the nature of his own beliefs.

Boomerang congratulates: AUREALIS AWARD WINNERS 2009!

A big congratulations to the Aurealis Award-winners i nthe children’s categories for 2009!

Children’s Illustrated Work / Picture Book
Victor’s Challenge by Pamela Freeman and Kim Gamble

Prince Victor and Valerian want to get married. But Victor, in his own unusual way, must pass three seemingly impossible tests of bravery, endurance and cleverness. He must go back into the Dark Forest of Nevermore to battle a fiery man-eating dragon, retrieve an armband from the peak of a wizard’s glass mountain, and uncover a tail feather from the rarest bird in the world.

Children’s Novel
A Ghost In My Suitcase by Gabrielle Wang

Thirteen-year-old Isabelle has travelled alone to China to visit Por Por her grandmother, and to release her mother’s ashes. Here she meets Ting Ting, an orphan who has been taken in by Por Por, and learns that her grandmother is a ghost-catcher – a gift that she too has inherited…

Young Adult Novel
Leviathan Trilogy: Book One by Scott Westerfeld

It is the beginning of the 20th century, 80 years after Darwin established the foundations of modern biology. But in the world of Leviathan these discoveries changed history more dramatically than in our own. England and France have perfected the the techniques of species fabrication, resulting in a glorious age of Edwardian biotechnology. In this world, Prince Aleksandar is on the run from those who would deny him his inheritance.

Illustrated Book / Graphic Novel
Scarygirl by Nathan Jurevicius

Abandoned on a remote beach, Scarygirl doesn’t know who she is or where she’s come from. Blister, a kind and intelligent giant octopus, wants to keep her safe, but Scarygirl needs answers. Who is the strange man haunting her dreams? Will Bunniguru help her unlock the mysteries of her past? Can she trust the wily forest dwellers? Her journey takes her to the edge, and beyond…Welcome to the world of Scarygirl.

Haiti Relief

The images coming in from Haiti are truely devastating. The Red Cross is appealling for over $100 million in relief funds, and Boomerang Books is looking to do its part. For every order you make in January, we will be donating $1 to the Australian Red Cross Haiti Appeal.

The funds raised through this appeal will be used to:

• support emergency relief, rehabilitation and recovery activities for communities affected by the disaster in Haiti
 
• send specialist aid workers to assist in the Red Cross Red Crescent Movement response

• support longer-term Red Cross programs of assistance in the affected areas.

Marchetta and Lanagan vie for Sakura Medal

The nominees for the 2010 Sakura Medal have been announced in Japan, with Australian authors making the list.

In the High School category, Melina Marchetta (for her Finnikin of the Rock), Joanne Horniman (My Candlelight Novel) and Margo Lanagan (Tender Morsels) join Boomerang Books’ own William Kostakis (Loathing Lola) in the running for the Medal.

Japanese international students vote for their favourite nominee. The winners will be announced on April 28, 2010.

Margo Lanagan will be appearing on the Boomerang Books Blog early in the New Year.

William’s note: I’m deeply honoured to have been selected on the list, especially among such fine company… It’s surreal to see my name beside so many authors I grew up with, admired, and aspired to be… Now, here’s hoping an Aussie brings it home! 🙂

A new era for BOOMERANG BOOKS

The new month has brought with it a new era for Boomerang Books, our brand new website is now live!

http://www.boomerangbooks.com.au

Pretty, huh?

But it isn’t just a fancy coat of paint. Here at Boomerang, we believe in providing our customers with an unparalleled user experience, something we feel this update does.

To celebrate the launch, we’d like to invite you and your friends to become members on the site for free. We’re giving every new member that signs up a $5 credit toward their first order as a member!

Sign up here: http://www.boomerangbooks.com.au/join

It only takes a couple of minutes.

So what’s new on the Boomerang Books website?

  • It’s much faster – searches are completed in milliseconds
  • It has a more contemporary design and slicker interface
  • Search results are presented in multiple formats allowing the user to find what they are looking for quickly and easily
  • It has new social networking features, including an RSS feed of ‘what’s happening’ on the site at any one time (and there’s more to come – watch this space)
  • It has smart Web 2.0-style gadgets, pop-ups and drop-downs to make the user experience more enjoyable, including ‘Someone just bought…’ and ‘Customers who bought this book also bought..’ selections
  • It features a new loyalty program called Boomerang Bucks. Buy books at Boomerang Books and earn Boomerang Bucks towards your next purchase
  • It’s integrated with Google Books, allowing the user to ‘look inside’ the growing list of books that have been digitised by Google
  • It’s integrated with Abebooks, giving you the option to purchase second hand copies of selected books
    There’s a new wishlist where you can store books that you might wish to purchase later on
  • It has a much-improved book review system, allowing users to submit their own book reviews and to provide a star rating for books they have read
  • It offers more payment options, including PayPal, BPay and bank deposit
  • Perhaps most importantly, the new website platform is extensible and we’re planning on some exciting developments in the coming months

So be sure to drop on by and become a member today! http://www.boomerangbooks.com.au/join

Boomerang Books Re-Launch

As frequent readers will no doubt know, we are extremely excited about the upcoming launch of Boomerang Books’ new website on 1 November 2009. But what exactly have our developers cooked up for you?

Well, we can say that it’s an industry-leading online bookstore platform, and we can tell you how great we think it is, but sometimes, the features need to speak for themselves.

  • It’s much faster – searches are completed in milliseconds
  • The design is contemporary, slick
  • Search results are presented in multiple formats, allowing you to find what you’re looking for faster
  • New social networking features, including an RSS feed of ‘what’s happening’ on the site at any one time
  • Smart Web 2.0-style gadgets, pop-ups and drop-downs to make your experience more enjoyable
  • A new loyalty program called Boomerang Bucks.  Buy books at Boomerang and earn Boomerang Bucks towards your next purchase
  • Integrated with Google Books, allowing you to ‘look inside’ books that have been digitised by Google
  • Integrated with Abebooks, giving you the option to purchase second-hand copies of selected books
  • A new wishlist, where you can store books that you might wish to purchase later on
  • A much-improved book review system, allowing users to submit their own book reviews and to rate books
  • More payment options, including PayPal, BPay and bank deposit

And there are more improvements on the way!

So, thank you for all your support, thank you to our beta testers, and thank you for your feedback. We look forward to an exciting step forward, alongside you, our faithful Boomerang customers. 🙂

Indigenous Literacy Project

Video courtesy of: Eden Media

Frequent readers of the blog will know that Boomerang Books is a proud supporter of the Indigenous Literacy Project. On September 2, 2009, we will be donating 10% of proceeds from book sales to the cause, so if you’ve been holding out on a particular purchase, and you want to do your part to help close the gap and improve Indigenous Literacy, drop by the store.

About the Indigenous Literacy Project

The Indigenous Literacy Project (ILP) is a partnership between the Australian Book Industry and The Fred Hollows Foundation.  

Working closely with the Australian Booksellers Association and the Australian Publishers Association, The Fred Hollows Foundation purchases and supplies books and other culturally appropriate learning materials to remote communities where The Foundation works.  Communities select and order reading material from catalogues and sample books provided by The Australian Booksellers Association.  The Fred Hollows Foundation staff also identify other literacy needs.  The books are then supplied to schools, libraries, early learning centres such as crèches, women’s Centres and other identified institutions, to enhance their pool of literacy resources.

For more information on the Indigenous Literacy Project, click here.

NSW Writers’ Centre: 4th Kids and YA Literature Festival (July 4-5)

Excitement is ramping up for the upcoming NSW Writers’ Centre’s two-day event, the 4th Kids and YA Literature Festival, held July 4-5. The Festival’s bringing together some of the best Australian authors and illustrators, publishers, scriptwriters and industry advocates in what has been dubbed “a celebration of story and the special world of Children’s Literature”.

I was lucky enough to have been invited as a guest speaker, but honestly, I’m far more excited about the company I keep, which includes Melina Marchetta, Garth Nix, Kate Forsyth (check out our interview here), Libby Gleeson, James Roy (check out our exclusive interview here), and Ursula Dubosarsky.

It’s shaping up to be a dynamic weekend. The Saturday is the day for the traditional Festival goings-on, speeches and panels, while the Sunday is dedicated to workshops, industry consultations and manuscript assessments with some of the best in the writing community.

So, Sydneysiders, if you’d like to meet me and other (read: more important) figures in the Australian Children’s literary landscape, there’s more information here.

ABC Radio National THE BOOK SHOW: Kids literature awards accused of elitism

A friend passed this on, and as a children’s author whose novel was ignored by awards judges, I have to say that I agree with the idea that there is an element of elitism in kids’ lit judging despite exceedingly favourable reviews… That said, I’m sure I’d be singing a different tune if my book was garnering awards… What do YOU think about this story from ABC?

http://www.abc.net.au/rn/bookshow/stories/2009/2595153.htm

Plenty of disgruntled authors both in Australia and abroad argue that there’s an underlying philosophy of snobbery among judges of children’s literature awards. Part of the problem is that the top prizes tend to go to books children don’t necessarily want to read.

But is there anything wrong with judges focusing on the highbrow end of the market, or should popularity play a part in their decisions? A confidential report commissioned by the Children’s Book Council of Australia suggests the time might be right to overhaul Australia’s top children’s literature award.

Melina Marchetta
Australian author of young adult fiction

James Maloney
Australian children’s author

Andy Griffiths
Australian children’s author

Mike Shuttleworth
Program Manager, Centre for Youth Literature, State Library of Victoria

Anita Silvey
American children’s book expert

The Indigenous Literacy Project Launch

“This project is a real opportunity for all Australians to get involved in a simple, effective and meaningful community activity. I encourage you, your school, your bookclub, or your organisation to be involved.”
– Thérèse Rein, Patron

This morning, I attended the launch of Book Buzz, an initiative of the Indigenous Literacy Project, at Customs House:

Unfortunately, this is the last photo my camera took before it decided to kick the proverbial bucket and only take corrupted .jpgs, something I only realised five minutes ago. Anyway, it was a great morning (and for the record, I took some great photos), with guests including Kate Grenville and Thérèse Rein. The Indigenous Literacy Project really is a worthwhile cause, one that Boomerang Books is proud to support.

I have an illiterate grandmother, and I know how frustrating life can be for her. She’s in her seventies, and she can’t read prescription labels on medication, street signs, or even her own name on letters. Her education was interrupted by World War II, and after that, she migrated to Australia. Luckily, she has her children, and grandchildren, and neighbours, and friends, to help her. In some indigenous communities, this support network doesn’t exist. And it isn’t a one-off event like the War that only causes illiteracy in one generation, as was the case with my grandmother, it is continued illiteracy, generation after generation. The Indigenous Literacy Project aims to raise literacy levels and, in turn, improve the lives of these Indigenous Australians living in remote and isolated regions.

This is done by providing books and literacy resources to indigenous communities and raising broad community awareness of indigenous literacy issues.

“Disappearing into a book and into someone else’s world and into another story is a great joy. And for me having three children, one of my joys was to drop down to browse in our local bookshop and to find great books with them.”
– Thérèse Rein, Patron

In 2007 and 2008, the Project raised over $500,000, and aims to raise another $250,000 in 2009.

To learn more about the Indigenous Literacy Project, or to make a donation, you can visit: http://www.indigenousliteracyproject.org.au

Sydney Writers’ Festival: An Evening With Wendy Harmer

And what an evening it was.

Tonight’s event at the Paddington Town Hall (“I went to a Sleaze Ball here once!” – Wendy Harmer) was completely different to the one earlier this afternoon. While Coming of Age was very much about the writing process, An Evening With Wendy Harmer was about the writer herself. I guess it’s because of Wendy’s history as a comedienne, or as her jacketflap bio puts it, “humourist”. She has a certain stage presence and is comfortable veering off-course. In fact, most of the evening was spent intentionally veering off Angela “I’m supposed to be interviewing you” Catterns’ script, because, as she said, “Nobody wants to hear about that, that’s boring.” And she was always right. As entertaining and funny and engaging as her books may be (and they are), Wendy Harmer’s not the sort of person you go to hear speak to learn about her authorial intent. You want jokes, you want anecdotes, you want her opinion on things, you want her guessing the weight of Angela Catterns’ breasts – and if you were there, you got exactly that.

As an aside, this wasn’t a session for the kiddies. As someone who grew up listening to her breakfast show on 2DayFM, it was a shock (and a pleasure) to hear her frequently drop the F-bomb in conversation.

Farewell My OvariesSprinkled in amongst the social commentary and relentless gags were brief mentions of her books. She was inspired to write Farewell My Ovaries because, reading chick- and hen-lit, she’d always be annoyed at the chapter breaks between the lines “They collapsed onto the bed in each others arms.” and “They woke up the next morning.” She wanted to write the sex, but writing sex is just like writing comedy, according to Wendy, because everybody has different tastes. As she puts it, one person’s “Come on over, sexy” can be someone else’s “Oh my God, get away from me”. Reactions were varied. She quoted one reviewer who described the sex as gruesome, and another that likened her exploration of sex to canonical texts I’ve forgotten since the event (my bad).

Roadside SistersShe also spoke about her newest release, Roadside Sisters, which sounds like your standard three-women-on-a-roadtrip, only doused in Harmer’s trademark humour. But, there were more pressing matters to discuss (see: Angela’s breasts – Wendy thinks they’re somewhere between one-and-a-half and two kilos each).

Five minutes before the conclusion of the session, Angela tried to steer Wendy into a bit of shameless promotion (and it worked, the book she shamelessly promoted, her personal favourite, Nagging For Beginners sold out the moment the Evening was over, and I was sure to grab a copy for Mum, which is currently being thoroughly enjoyed, judging by the laughter coming from her bedroom). She acted out a few of the featured nags, including my favourite, the Nagging for BeginnersStriptease Nag, which, if you ever have the pleasure of seeing her perform, is the funniest thing ever.

Comedienne or humourist, whatever you want to call her, Wendy is an entertainer. If you ever have the chance to go and see her live, I whole-heartedly recommend her. If you want something to keep you company until then, there’s always her writing and her podcasts.

2009 NSW Premier’s Literary Award Winners

Boomerang Books would like to congratulate all the winners of the 2009 NSW Premier’s Literary Awards. We’re proud of you as book lovers and as Australians.

People’s Choice Award
Steve Toltz, A Fraction of the Whole
The fact is, the whole of Australia despises my father more than any other man, just as they adore my uncle more than any other man. I might as well set the story straight about both of them. Heroes or criminals? Crackpots or visionaries? Relatives or enemies? It’s a simple family story. From the New South Wales bush to bohemian Paris, from sports fields to strip clubs, from the jungles of Thailand to a leaky boat in the Pacific, A Fraction of the Whole follows the Deans on their freewheeling, scathingly funny and finally deeply moving quest to leave their mark on the world.

2008 Book of the Year Award ($10,000) & UTS Glenda Adams Award for New Writing ($5,000, sponsored by UTS)
Nam Le, The Boat
In 1979, Nam Le’s family left Vietnam for Australia, an experience that inspires the first and last stories in The Boat. In between, however, Le’s imagination lays claim to the world. The Boat takes us from a tourist in Tehran to a teenage hit man in Colombia from an ageing New York artist to a boy coming of age in a small Victorian fishing town from the city of Hiroshima just before the bomb is dropped to the haunting waste of the South China Sea in the wake of another war. Each story uncovers a raw human truth. Each story is absorbing and fully realised as a novel. Together, they make up a collection of astonishing diversity and achievement.

Special Award ($20,000)
Ms Katharine Brisbane AM for her service to Australian literature and theatre. Click HERE for a list of her writing.

 

 

 

 
Christina Stead Prize for fiction ($40,000)
Joan London, The Good Parents
Maya de Jong, an eighteen-year-old country girl, comes to live in Melbourne and starts an affair with her boss, the enigmatic Maynard Flynn, whose wife is dying of cancer. When Maya’s parents, Toni and Jacob, arrive to stay with her, they are told by her housemate that Maya has gone away and no one knows where she is. As Toni and Jacob wait and search for Maya in Melbourne, everything in their lives is brought into question. They recall the yearning and dreams, the betrayals and choices of their pasts – choices with unexpected and irrevocable consequences. With Maya’s disappearance, the lives of all those close to her come into focus, to reveal the complexity of the ties that bind us to one another, to parents, children, siblings, friends and lovers.

Douglas Stewart Prize for non-fiction ($40,000)
Chloe Hooper, The Tall Man: death and life on Palm Island
In 2004 Cameron Doomadgee, a 36-year-old resident of Palm Island, was arrested for swearing at a white police officer. Within 45 minutes he was dead. The main suspect was well respected Senior Sergeant Christopher Hurley. This is the story of what happened, the trial, and the Aboriginal myths around the case.

 Kenneth Slessor Prize for poetry ($30,000)
L K Holt, Man Wolf Man
L K Holt’s poems are stories, and eruptions from the midst of story. They are also pure lyric. A feeling for the formality of language guides her lines through a music of rhyme, half-rhyme (and quarter-rhyme) and turns found images of this world into blazon. She explores some dark matters – with homages to Goya, through the eyes of his mistress, and to Donne. She has a particular touch with the sensory strangeness in states of extremity; yet the giftedness of life breaks into vision in Holt’s poetry with lightness.

Patricia Wrightson Prize for children’s literature ($30,000)
Ursula Dubosarsky, illustrated by Tohby Riddle, The Word Spy
Discover the meaning of acronyms, cliches and spoonerisms. Find out the history of the alphabet, punctuation, pen names and plurals. Learn how to trick your friends by speaking in Pig Latin or rhyming slang. This entertaining, quirky and enlightening look at the English language is full of games, puzzles, facts and riddles. Ages 9+.

Ethel Turner Prize for young people’s literature ($30,000)
Michelle Cooper, A Brief History of Montmaray
Sophie FitzOsborne lives in a crumbling castle in the tiny island kingdom of Montmaray, along with her tomboy younger sister Henry, her beautiful, intellectual cousin Veronica, and Veronica’s father, the completely mad King John. When Sophie receives a leather-bound journal for her sixteenth birthday, she decides to write about her day-to-day life on the island. But it is 1936 and the world is in turmoil. Does the arrival of two strangers threaten everything Sophie holds dear? From Sophie’s charming and lively observations to a nail-biting, unputdownable ending, this is a book to be treasured.

Script Writing Award ($30,000)
Louis Nowra, Rachel Perkins & Beck Cole, First Australians

Play Award ($30,000)
Daniel Keene, The Serpent’s Teeth, Sydney Theatre Company, Currency Press

Community Relations Commission Award ($15,000, sponsored by the CRC)
Eric Richards, Destination Australia: migration to Australia since 1901
In 1901 most Australians were loyal, white subjects of the British Empire with direct connections to Britain. Within a hundred years, following an unparalleled immigration program, its population was one of the most diverse on earth. No other country has achieved such radical social and demographic change in so short a time. Destination Australia tells the story of this extraordinary transformation. Against the odds, this change has caused minimal social disruption and tension. While immigration has generated some political and social anxieties, Australia has maintained a stable democracy and a coherent social fabric. One of the impressive achievements of the book is in explaining why this might be so.

Gleebooks Prize ($10,000, sponsored by Gleebooks)
David Love, Unfinished Business: Paul Keating’s interrupted revolution
Veteran economic and financial observer, David Love, explores the story of Keating’s revolution – a story that has never before been fully told – and sounds a timely warning that the failure to finish the job Keating started has left our new-found prosperity vulnerable, particularly in the current climate of international economic uncertainty. The revolution, it turns out, is at least as relevant to the future as it has been to the past.

The Biennial NSW Premier’s Translation Prize ($30,000)
David Colmer for his translations from the Dutch.